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Advocacy Update: Senate Moves to Reverse Research Cuts

In February, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director, Francis Collins, and Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) warned us of the impending impact the sequester will have on biomedical research. Francis Collins echoed Senator Mikulski’s clear warning: She stated the so-called sequestration would slow scientific progress, delay clinical trials, and put a generation of young researchers at risk if NIH’s $31 billion budget for this year is trimmed by $1.5 billion. (Quote Source: Science Insider. Feb. 21, 2013) On June 20, members of the Senate were able to show some support for cancer research funding. Led by Senator Mikulski (D-MD), the Chair of the Senate Committee on Appropriations, the committee approved a

Fight CRC Hits NYC — Summertime Planning Updates

One Million Strong is a MOVEMENT uniting those impacted by colorectal cancer. And last week – Fight Colorectal Cancer was on the MOVE. Check out what was happening amongst some of our team members as they hit New York City! Planning One Million Strong: NYC 2014 Anjee Davis, VP of Programs, and Emily White, Program Coordinator, got the wheels in motion for next year’s One Million Strong event in New York City. They met with event planning specialists at Studio PR to get the creative juices flowing. We’re excited to make next year’s event even bigger and better! Stay tuned for details on how to volunteer and get involved in

Hausmanns Raise Awareness, Funds through Softball and Horseshoes

Sometimes, love is seen through a Lady-and-the-Tramp kind of story – Italian dinners lead to sharing spaghetti and gazing into one another’s eyes. At Fight Colorectal Cancer, we have another kind of love story that gives us warm fuzzies every time we see 2013 Advocates of the Year Eric and Rose Hausmann. But instead of spaghetti dinners, the story revolves around softball. And some horseshoes. Meet the Hausmanns Many at Fight Colorectal Cancer are familiar with Rose and Eric Hausmann. They’re at the Call-on Congress year after year and chair the Grassroots Action Committee. They helped launch One Million Strong in Times Square. Rose is the cover girl for our

Stage II Colon Cancer – Chemo or No Chemo?

A brief in a running series from 2013 ASCO® conference: Prognostic Tests – to use or not use . . .  or rather  … To treat or not to treat? New studies for stage II colon cancer patients contemplating chemotherapy . by: Nancy Roach One of the toughest decisions for patients with stage II colon cancer is whether or not to receive chemotherapy after surgery. In a perfect world, there would be a test that could predict whether or not the cancer will reoccur and research to predict which treatment will help each patient at risk. For now, each patient’s decision is based on a wide variety of factors. Tests to

Experts Issue Practice-Changing Advice: Stop giving calcium/magnesium for oxaliplatin-caused neuropathy

For patients getting the common FOLFOX chemotherapy for colorectal cancer, many oncologists add intravenous calcium and magnesium, hoping to decrease the neuropathy (nerve damage) associated with oxaliplatin-based drugs. But this week, experts at the 2013 ASCO meeting (American Society of Clinical Oncology), announced strong evidence that the calcium/magnesium does no good in either preventing or decreasing neuropathy—and it should no longer be part of routine treatment. Neuropathy affects cancer treatment Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy (e.g. FOLFOX, with Eloxatin®) is one of the most commonly used drugs for people having high-risk stage II, or stages III or IV colorectal cancer. But far too often after patients have had many doses of FOLFOX over

Don’t confuse bargain shopping with saving lives!

FIGHT COLORECTAL CANCER RESPONSE TO NEW YORK TIMES ARTICLE (6/03/2013): Fight Colorectal Cancer applauds the New York Times for shedding light on how revenue is generated by medical practices. Importantly however, the crux of the issue is not the use or overuse of colonoscopies and the variance in pricing. Rather, the main problem to be fixed in the United States is a broken fee-reimbursement structure that puts pressure on local practices and hospitals to inflate the price of reliable and needed services, like colonoscopies, to compensate for under-reimbursement for other medical services. It is unfortunate that colorectal cancer screening is used in this article as a primary example of failure

Clinical Conundrum: When, how to treat colorectal cancer in the elderly

Even as scientists plumb deep into cells and molecules to understand cancer, there are many immediate and “real-life” questions that researchers and clinicians are discussing at the 2013 annual ASCO meeting (American Society of Clinical Oncology). One of the biggest puzzles for colorectal cancer is how to best treat the elderly, especially those with stages II or III (non-metastatic) cancer. It’s a huge question: today, 40 percent of colorectal cancer patients are elderly, and by the year 2030, more than 70 percent of non-inherited colorectal cancer will be among those 65 or older. Currently, 70 years old is the median age at diagnosis, with fully 40 percent of diagnoses made

“Hope and Progress” takes an army – 30,000 of them!

As you may already have read, team members of Fight Colorectal Cancer which includes Staff, Board, Grassroots Action Committee (GAC) along with our Medical Advisory Board (MAB) have been in full swing at the Chicago 2013 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. The American Society of Clinical Oncology® has been on top of their game with the distribution of material which we can barely keep up with! You can find a treasure chest of details here. This is by far the world’s largest organization of cancer specialists in one place at any time during the year. They are gathered to listen to scientific researchers present their latest findings, clinical specialists (oncologists, surgeons, radiologists,

ACA Mandates Insurance Coverage for Clinical Trials

By January 1, all insurers will be required to cover routine care for patients enrolled in clinical trials. (Typically any experimental care is provided at no cost to the patient.) “This should be seen as a step forward for the U.S. oncology community,” wrote Dr. Y-Ning Wong in the ASCO Daily News from the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s meeting in Chicago. “However, patients and providers must remain vigilant about the law’s implementation.” Currently there is a patchwork of state laws; as of January  2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) creates a federally required minimum that all private insurers must cover at least the usual care when patients enroll in a

Cancer Experts Gather at Chicago ASCO

With more than 30,000 members worldwide, ASCO (the American Society for Clinical Oncology) is the world’s largest organization of cancer specialists. Today in Chicago, hundreds are gathering for the annual ASCO meeting where scientific researchers present their latest findings, and clinical specialists (oncologists, surgeons, radiologists, nurses) begin to hear how the new science can be applied to their patients. Fight Colorectal Cancer is represented at ASCO by staff, Board members, and four of its Medical Advisory Board who will be presenting their own research and papers. (Watch here for reports.) “The average oncologist really needs to understand more molecular biology now than ever before,” noted Scientific Program Committee Chairman Dr. Douglas

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