Research & Treatment News articles

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2014 Award Winners

2014 Award Winners

Each March at Call-on Congress, Fight Colorectal Cancer recognizes individuals who exemplify what our organization is all about. These people are not only advocates – they’re champions. Each of them offers their experience and passion to further the cause. This year’s 2014 Award Winners set the bar high. Advocate of the Year – Gordon Cole A survivor of stage IV colorectal cancer since 2003, Gordon Cole is an inspiration. As a hands-on patient, he’s actively monitored his own treatment (which consists of multiple surgeries, radiation, chemotherapy and several clinical trials.) As an advocate, he’s pushed for better policy and research funding. His constant voice has helped us raise colorectal cancer

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7th Lisa Fund Grant Awarded to Dr. Ho-Chou Tu

Fight Colorectal Cancer is excited to announce that Dr. Ho-Chou Tu received our 7th Lisa Fund Fellowship Grant – a $50,000 award given to a late-stage colorectal cancer researcher. This award is distributed through the Lisa Fund in partnership with American Association of Cancer Research (AACR.) Dr. Tu is a research fellow at the Children’s Hospital in Boston. She plans to use the award to determine the relationship between the Lin28A/B gene and colon cancer progression and prognosis. She hopes that her research will lead to predictive biomarkers for prognosis of colon cancer and a potential therapeutic target aimed to reduce colon cancer progression. Dr. Tu, a native of Taiwan,

Clarification: Panel Approves Cologuard (not the FDA)

Fight Colorectal Cancer submitted public comments to the FDA last week regarding new colorectal cancer screening tests, including Cologuard by Exact Sciences and Epi proColon by epigenomics. (Read comments here.) Cologuard Update As a result of the advisory committee meeting, an FDA panel voted 10-0 to recommend that the FDA approve Cologuard. Cologuard is a stool-based screening test that looks for DNA in a patient’s stool that may detect genetic changes associated with cancer cells in the colon or rectum. A positive result from this test would lead patients to diagnostic colonoscopy. In this case, as we commented on new screening technologies we kept the following considerations in mind: 1)

Comments on New DNA & Stool-Based Screening Tests to FDA

This week Fight Colorectal Cancer is providing comments to the FDA as they consider two new screening technologies for colorectal cancer. Below are our opinions and recommendations presented to the Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel as part of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. Background: This week, the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) is hosting an advisory committee meeting with many stakeholders that have an interest in two new potential screening technologies, Epi proColon (by Epigenomics) and Cologuard (by Exact Sciences). Kim Ryan, our Director of Patient Information Services and advocate Marcia Mullins are attending to provide comments as the FDA considers these two new screening technologies.   About Epi proColon & Cologuard

New Screening Tool: PillCam COLON

by gastroenterologist and Fight Colorectal Cancer board member Indran Indrakrishnan M.D.  PillCam® COLON  is a new technology to evaluate the colon for polyps. The FDA recently gave clearance for the PillCam® COLON to be used in patients following an incomplete colonoscopy. Read more here. The basic concept of capsule endoscopy has been in practice for nearly 10 years for evaluating the small bowel. The PillCam® COLON relies on a thorough, high-quality bowel preparation for accuracy, just like colonoscopy, and serves as a new screening tool complementary to a colonoscopy. Uses of the New Technology This new technology will be particularly useful for: 1. Patients who are not willing to undergo an invasive procedure 2. The occasional

Why Do Drugs Cost So Much?

by Chris Adams A response to A Tale of Two Drugs, an article by Barry Werth published in the MIT Technology Review Oct. 2013 Drug prices. Why are they so high? In a recent article for the MIT Technology Review, Barry Werth considers the pricing of two recently developed and very expensive drugs. The first drug is used for cystic fibrosis and costs almost $25,000 per month. The second drug is used for metastatic colon cancer and is priced at $11,000 per month. So why are these drugs so expensive? Why do companies charge so much for their drugs? The simple answer is that they can and so they do.

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Preview: 5 Advocates To Attend 2014 GI Cancer Symposium

Next week, five research advocates from Fight Colorectal Cancer will attend the 2014 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium in San Francisco, CA. This annual conference presents the latest science in treating all GI cancers, including colorectal cancer. According to the Symposium, it “offers a fresh perspective on gastrointestinal cancers, with a special focus on the most pertinent information oncologists of all subspecialties need to know now in order to provide the highest quality of care.” It’s expected that researchers, physicians, scientists and others who work in the GI cancer field will attend. But thanks to survivors willing to use their voices and our research advocacy program – patients will also have a

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Survivorship Researcher’s Response to WSJ Article on Cancer Care

by Andrea (Andi) Dwyer, The Colorado School of Public Health and University of Colorado Cancer Center Response to the Wall Street Journal article:  The Next Front in Cancer Care Cancer survivorship topics are featured in the Wall Street Journal? How exciting! As noted in the article by the WSJ, Treatment Summaries and Survivorship Care Plans (TS/SCP) are now encouraged and required by The Commission on Cancer.  Several foundations and survivorship champions have begun to offer templates and structure to help clinical teams and treatment facilities provide the specific information. The hope is that they help patients bridge primary care with understanding of their treatment and health recommendations going forward. The large scale

Should Pink October Turn Blue?

By Chris Adams, Research Advocate for Fight Colorectal Cancer Last month, you may have noticed the pink jetliners, pink NFL players and pink garbage trucks.  Yes, it was Pink October, also known as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM).  NBCAM is probably the biggest and most successful public awareness campaign in modern US history.  NBCAM’s goal is to increase awareness of the need to screen for breast cancer through mammograms.  Now we are in November and you may have noticed that your colleagues are sporting more facial hair than Mumford and Sons.  Yes, it is Movember or No-shavember or something, the up and coming awareness month for prostate cancer screening

Lisa Fund Grant: Now Accepting Applications

Postdoctoral or clinical research fellows planning to do translational or clinical research that focuses on novel THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES for late-stage metastatic colorectal cancer may now apply for The Fight Colorectal Cancer-AACR research grant. This grant is distributed through Fight Colorectal Cancer’s Lisa Fund. Our Lisa Fund was designed by Lisa Dubow, a late-stage colorectal cancer survivor who credited her many years of survival to clinical research. She established the fund to support researchers looking for a cure and new treatment options. This grant specifically supports research focused on uncovering new therapeutics that can be individualized for patients. Ideally, findings from the grant-funded project will play out into the clinical setting within a few

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