Research & Treatment News articles

New Screening Tool: PillCam COLON

by gastroenterologist and Fight Colorectal Cancer board member Indran Indrakrishnan M.D.  PillCam® COLON  is a new technology to evaluate the colon for polyps. The FDA recently gave clearance for the PillCam® COLON to be used in patients following an incomplete colonoscopy. Read more here. The basic concept of capsule endoscopy has been in practice for nearly 10 years for evaluating the small bowel. The PillCam® COLON relies on a thorough, high-quality bowel preparation for accuracy, just like colonoscopy, and serves as a new screening tool complementary to a colonoscopy. Uses of the New Technology This new technology will be particularly useful for: 1. Patients who are not willing to undergo an invasive procedure 2. The occasional

Why Do Drugs Cost So Much?

by Chris Adams A response to A Tale of Two Drugs, an article by Barry Werth published in the MIT Technology Review Oct. 2013 Drug prices. Why are they so high? In a recent article for the MIT Technology Review, Barry Werth considers the pricing of two recently developed and very expensive drugs. The first drug is used for cystic fibrosis and costs almost $25,000 per month. The second drug is used for metastatic colon cancer and is priced at $11,000 per month. So why are these drugs so expensive? Why do companies charge so much for their drugs? The simple answer is that they can and so they do.

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Preview: 5 Advocates To Attend 2014 GI Cancer Symposium

Next week, five research advocates from Fight Colorectal Cancer will attend the 2014 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium in San Francisco, CA. This annual conference presents the latest science in treating all GI cancers, including colorectal cancer. According to the Symposium, it “offers a fresh perspective on gastrointestinal cancers, with a special focus on the most pertinent information oncologists of all subspecialties need to know now in order to provide the highest quality of care.” It’s expected that researchers, physicians, scientists and others who work in the GI cancer field will attend. But thanks to survivors willing to use their voices and our research advocacy program – patients will also have a

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Survivorship Researcher’s Response to WSJ Article on Cancer Care

by Andrea (Andi) Dwyer, The Colorado School of Public Health and University of Colorado Cancer Center Response to the Wall Street Journal article:  The Next Front in Cancer Care Cancer survivorship topics are featured in the Wall Street Journal? How exciting! As noted in the article by the WSJ, Treatment Summaries and Survivorship Care Plans (TS/SCP) are now encouraged and required by The Commission on Cancer.  Several foundations and survivorship champions have begun to offer templates and structure to help clinical teams and treatment facilities provide the specific information. The hope is that they help patients bridge primary care with understanding of their treatment and health recommendations going forward. The large scale

Should Pink October Turn Blue?

By Chris Adams, Research Advocate for Fight Colorectal Cancer Last month, you may have noticed the pink jetliners, pink NFL players and pink garbage trucks.  Yes, it was Pink October, also known as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM).  NBCAM is probably the biggest and most successful public awareness campaign in modern US history.  NBCAM’s goal is to increase awareness of the need to screen for breast cancer through mammograms.  Now we are in November and you may have noticed that your colleagues are sporting more facial hair than Mumford and Sons.  Yes, it is Movember or No-shavember or something, the up and coming awareness month for prostate cancer screening

Lisa Fund Grant: Now Accepting Applications

Postdoctoral or clinical research fellows planning to do translational or clinical research that focuses on novel THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES for late-stage metastatic colorectal cancer may now apply for The Fight Colorectal Cancer-AACR research grant. This grant is distributed through Fight Colorectal Cancer’s Lisa Fund. Our Lisa Fund was designed by Lisa Dubow, a late-stage colorectal cancer survivor who credited her many years of survival to clinical research. She established the fund to support researchers looking for a cure and new treatment options. This grant specifically supports research focused on uncovering new therapeutics that can be individualized for patients. Ideally, findings from the grant-funded project will play out into the clinical setting within a few

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What the Government Shutdown Means for Colorectal Cancer

After 15 days, most of us have seen at least one way the government shutdown is impacting our country. Some have friends and family members on furlough who’ve finally had time to paint their bathrooms. Others’ vacation plans are ruined since national monuments and parks are closed. But the ripples of the shutdown go beyond closings, halted jobs and a growing annoyance with our country’s leaders. The shutdown is impacting cancer patients and researchers across the globe and hope for a cure. The Government and Cancer Research Last week the Washington Post ran a front-page story about a beautiful young mom whose treatment for sarcoma is halted because of the

Generic Xeloda Now Available

Last week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first generic version of Xeloda (capecitabine), an oral chemotherapy pill used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer. Kathleen Uhl, M.D., acting director of the Office of Generic Drugs in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, says “Generic drugs are important options that allow greater access to health care for all Americans. This medication is widely used by people living with cancer, so it is important to have access to affordable treatment options.” Teva Pharmaceuticals will be the new manufacturer of the generic capecitabine. Availability of the generic on the market has yet to be determined. Read the release from

You got Science in our RATS Boot Camp . . .

What happens when you combine colorectal cancer survivors and a scientist? You get a force to be reckoned with! The RATS program was started by Fight Colorectal Cancer founder Nancy Roach and our late Director of Research Kate Murphy over 6 years ago, as a way to work hand in hand with the scientific community across the country. In 2012, Dan Dixon joined our advocacy efforts and has embraced the idea that survivors can be trained to participate in and and be a part of the research discussions. Bringing his own institution on board the University of Kansas Cancer Center higlighted our partnership and the good work we are doing

IS IT TRUE? Oral Hygiene Impacts Colon Cancer?

Did everyone see the buzz about oral hygiene and colon cancer? Here’s a quick report from Cleveland’s newspaper The Plain Dealer about the research uncovered at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Dental Medicine: … Research, published online today in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, explains how the bacterium [gingivitis-causing bacteria] may turn on tumor growth in the colon, and also identifies a way to prevent its action. The researchers also hope their work will lead to a diagnostic tool that will help identify those at risk of colon cancer earlier in the disease’s progression. Read the full article about Colon Cancer and Oral Bacteria. So – is it true? Can

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