..."/>

Colorectal Cancer News in Brief: August 7

Research has found aspirin or resistant starch doesn’t help people with Lynch syndrome avoid new polyps.  While almost all people had seen a cancer-related ad, very few actually got a prescription for the advertised drug. People who followed a low-fat, high-fiber diet most carefully had fewer new polyps.

A Johns Hopkins team has developed SUDS — a device for cleaning ER equipment that wipes out dangerous bacteria and keeps it from returning for several days.  The Caring Connection will help you find advance directive forms and instructions for your state.

Research Reports

Other Headlines

  • A team at Johns Hopkins has developed a device, similar to a shower cubicle, that can clean and decontaminate hard-to-clean emergency room equipment from electrocardigram machines to  cell phones.  SUDS or  the Self-cleaning Unit for the Decontamination of Small instruments beats manual scrubbing for removing bacteria and keeping it away for at least two days.  Two days after manual cleaning, 1 in 4 devices had new bacterial growth, but SUDS-cleaned devices were bacteria-free even in heavy ER settings.  Treatment inside the 7 foot high SUDS machine didn’t appear to damage electronics, and its use can replace expensive  and wasteful disposables.  Development and testing of the SUDS device is described in Annals of Surgical Innovation and Research, online July 30, 2009.
  • Caring Connections, a program of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, provides free advance directives and instructions for each state that can be downloaded and filled out.  The packets include information about the HIPAA Privacy Rule and the specific forms and information you’ll need for your own state.  Depending on the state, advance directives allow you to appoint an advocate or proxy to make health care decisions if you are unable to speak for yourself and to specify what health care you do or do not want if you are critically ill.

Related posts

*

*


2 + six =

Top