Fight Colorectal Cancer Summaries

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Each legislative priority is weighted equally and our lists are not in order of importance. The following summaries will provide you with background information and our recommendations (“actions.”)

Funding for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC)

Funding for the Department of Defense (DoD)

Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP)

Funding for the National Cancer Institute (NCI)

Federal Funding Sequestration

Eliminate Cost Sharing for Colorectal Cancer Screening Colonoscopy

Chemotherapy Parity

Colorectal Cancer Prevention, Early Detection, and Treatment Act


Funding for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP)

Roughly 140,000 Americans will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer this year, and more than 50,000 will die from the disease, making it the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States – but it doesn’t have to be. Colorectal cancer can be prevented and detected early thanks to screening; yet one in three adults between the ages of 50 and 75 is not up-to-date with recommended screening.  The CDC’s Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP) currently funds screening and education programs in 25 states and four tribal nations, playing an important role in increasing colorectal cancer awareness and helping patients navigate screening.  Fight Colorectal Cancer supports $55 million for colorectal cancer prevention programs in FY 2015. A funding level of $55 million would restore the CDC’s CRCCP funding to its FY 2010 level of $45 million and fund a new $10 million CDC demonstration program aimed at innovative projects that support increased screening rates for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers.

Fight Colorectal Cancer’s Ask to Congress: Request to appropriators that funding for colorectal cancer prevention programs at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) be increased to $55 million for FY 2015 and continue to oppose consolidation of the cancer control programs. Back to Top


Funding for the Department of Defense (DoD) Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP)

Colorectal cancer has been eligible for funding under the PRCRP since FY 2010. Colorectal cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer among active duty military personnel.  Additionally, service members who are exposed to ionizing radiation in the field are at increased risk of colorectal cancer. The program has supported research into a non-invasive genetic urine test for colorectal cancer, as well as research on genes associated with ionizing radiation sensitivity and resistance.

Fight Colorectal Cancer’s Ask to Congress: Continue to include colorectal cancer as eligible for research funding under the Department of Defense’s (DoD) Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP).  Support at least $25 million for the PRCRP in FY 2015. Back to Top


Funding for the National Cancer Institute (NCI)

The NCI funds critical colorectal cancer research, including the Specialized Programs of Research Excellence, which enables rapid and efficient movement of basic scientific findings into clinical settings. In the 112th Congress, Fight Colorectal Cancer requested that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) be funded at $32.7 billion in FY 2013, which would provide the NCI with $5.36 billion. In June, the Senate Appropriations Committee approved its Labor-HHS-Education spending bill, which would boost funding to the NIH by $100 million, for a total of $30.7 billion. Of that amount, $5.084 billion is allocated to the NCI, which constitutes a $15 million increase. The House Labor-HHS-Education would flat fund the NIH at $30.6 million. The result is a $2 million cut to the NCI. Final action on a FY 2013 Labor-HHS-Education spending bill is still pending.

Fight Colorectal Cancer’s Ask to Congress: Make funding for cancer research, including colorectal cancer research, a top priority. Support FY 2015 funding for National Institutes (NIH) at $32 billion, including $5.26 billion for the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Back to Top


Federal Funding Sequestration

In August 2011, Senate Democrats and House Republicans brokered a compromise to trim $2 trillion from the budget deficit. Under the deal, $1 trillion in spending cuts will occur across defense and non-defense spending programs and will be phased in over 10 years. An additional $1.2 trillion in cuts will occur over the next 10 years through a process of automatic across-the-board spending cuts, or sequestration, of both defense and non-defense programs. Sequestration is required because the congressional Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, which was established by the law, failed to reach agreement on a deficit reduction plan. Sequestration was to take effect on Jan. 2, 2013. The Passage of the American Taxpayer Relief Act in January 2013 delayed sequestration until March 1, 2013, and the overall amount of cuts was reduced by $24 billion, equally divided between defense and non-defense programs. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities estimates that if sequestration takes effect on March 1, 2013, non-defense discretionary (NDD) programs would be cut more than $26 billion, which would result in an across-the-board cut of 5.1 percent. As a result fewer NIH grants would be funded and CDC programs would be cut. Action: Fight Colorectal Cancer will advocate against sequestration for non-defense discretionary programs, medical research and prevention programs in particular, as well as for a balanced approach to deficit reduction. Back to Top


Eliminate Cost Sharing for Colorectal Cancer Screening Colonoscopy

 Medicare law covers colorectal cancer screenings without Medicare beneficiary cost sharing (coinsurance and deductible). However, an oversight in current law requires many Medicare beneficiaries to pay coinsurance if during a colorectal cancer screening colonoscopy a physician removes a potentially precancerous polyp.  The “Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act” (H.R. 1070) corrects current law so screening colonoscopies with polyp removal do not trigger a coinsurance liability for Medicare beneficiaries.  Contact Dan Martini in Rep. Charlie Dent’s office to cosponsor H.R. 1070.

Fight Colorectal Cancer Ask to Congress:  Pass legislation to eliminate Medicare beneficiary coinsurance for colorectal cancer screening colonoscopy. Back to Top


Chemotherapy Parity

Many cancer patients have to pay significantly more out-of-pocket for oral anticancer treatments (e.g., pills) than they do for intravenous treatments. Legislation was introduced in the 112th Congress that requires insurers that cover anticancer medications that are intravenously administered or injected to provide no less favorable coverage for oral anticancer medications. The Cancer Drug Coverage Parity Act was only introduced in the House. Action: Fight Colorectal Cancer will work with stakeholder allies to achieve reintroduction and advocate passage of the Cancer Drug Coverage Parity Act in the 113th Congress. Back to Top


Colorectal Cancer Prevention, Early Detection, and Treatment Act

Fight Colorectal Cancer has been the impetus behind introduction of the Colorectal Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment Act. This legislation would essentially expand and improve upon the CRCCP. The bill is authorizing legislation, which means that even if the legislation is enacted into law, funding to implement the law would still need to be appropriated. In the 112th Congress, the bill had the support of 30 cosponsors in the House and four in the Senate. Action: Fight Colorectal Cancer will support the reintroduction of the bill in the 113th Congress. Back to Top

 

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