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McNeil Expands Recalls

The FDA has announced that McNeil Consumer Healthcare has expanded its voluntary over-the-counter drug recalls to include additional types of Tylenol, as well as certain formulations of Motrin, Rolaids, Benedryl, Simply Sleep, and St. Joseph’s aspirin.  The recall includes Children’s Tylenol Meltaways and Children’s Motrin caplets and chewables.

A full list of recalled products and the lots has been posted on the FDA site.

Consumers have noticed a moldy, musty, or mildew-like smell when opening the medicines that has sometimes been associated with nausea, vomiting, stomach pain or diarrhea.  Effects have been temporary and not serious.

McNeil has traced the odor to small amounts of a chemical called 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA).  TBA results from a breakdown of a chemical that is sometimes applied to wood pallets used to store and transport cases of the over-the-counter drugs.

The health effects of TBA haven’t been well-studied, according to McNeil, but there are no reports in medical literature of serious problems connected with it.  However, the company is continuing to investigate the issue and will no longer use pallets treated with TBA-associated chemicals to ship products.  They have also asked companies who ship supplies to their plants not to use treated pallets.

More information about the product recall is on the McNeil Product Recall website including:

  • Full listing of recalled products with pictures of packaging, UPC codes, and lot numbers
  • How to return items for refund or replacement
  • How to dispose of recalled medicines safely

McNeil tells consumers not to empty unused medicines in the sink, toilet, or storm drain.  If possible, they should be taken to a pharmacy or community “take-back” program.  Otherwise, they should be securely sealed in an unrecognizable container where children or pets do not have access and thrown in household trash.

A link to SMARxTDisposal.Net has more information about safely disposing of unused medicines.  SMARxT recommends combining medicines with kitty litter, coffee grounds, or similar materials to make them less attractive for children or pets to eat.

More information can be obtained by calling McNeil Consumer Healthcare at 888-222-6036.

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