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FLO’S WORDS OF WISDOM : THE ANNUAL AACR MEETING AND BEING A RAT

FLO’S WORDS OF WISDOM : THE ANNUAL AACR MEETING AND BEING A RAT

I had the great opportunity to attend this year’s American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) meeting in San Diego and what an experience it was!  I arrived on Saturday morning and the first thing I did was try to acquaint myself with the hotel, as there was a satellite registration for attendees in the lobby – the very huge, spacious, long lobby!  There were over 20,000 attendees in multiple hotels throughout the area. We were fortunate to be in the conference hotel adjacent to the convention center. Breakout Groups In the afternoon we had lunch and the opening meeting of our advocacy groups. Our groups consisted of six teams with

Two Advances in Understanding, Treating Painful Chemo Neuropathy

Recent studies show some promise in understanding chemo-caused neuropathy, and perhaps in using a common medicine to ease the worst symptoms in some people. Study shows neuropathy relief for some using antidepressant  A well-designed clinical study has provided the first evidence that the antidepressant Cymbalta® (duloxetine) can provide some patients with significant relief from peripheral neuropathy caused by chemotherapy. From 20 to 40 percent of cancer patients given neurotoxic chemotherapy–taxanes, platinum-based including Eloxatin® (oxaliplatin), vinca alkaloids, bortezomib–will develop painful peripheral neuropathy (numbness, tingling, burning in hands or feet). If the pain is severe, colorectal cancer patients often have to reduce the dose or stop taking Eloxatin. Even then, this painful condition

Scientists and Advocates Rally for Medical Research

The annual scientific meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research took a little lunch break on Monday, April 8th in Washington, D.C., while the attendees streamed outside to join a crowd of several thousand gathered across the street for a loud street rally. “When [Congress] sees a grassroots movement rising up from doctors, from scientists, from advocates, and patients, you become impossible to ignore,” cancer survivor Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) told the cheering crowd. (Watch video of the speakers here.) Fight Colorectal Cancer was one of 200-plus organizations who gathered and supported the  Rally for Medical Research, aimed at the politicians who have made, and are making,  decisions about budget cuts. The

Fighting Crisis in Cancer Funding Named Number One Priority for AACR

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) says that declining budgets at the National Institutes of Health a crisis standing in the way of bringing cancer research to patient’s lives. For the past ten years, NIH budgets have been essentially flat.  Factoring in rising research costs, flat funding means a loss of nearly $6 billion dollars in purchasing power. AACR is calling on its members and the advocacy community to work even harder with Congress to invest in medical research.  The AACR board of directors said, Therefore, the AACR announced this morning that it plans to redouble its efforts to engage with Congress to make research funding a higher national

Nancy Roach Tells AACR — Get Involved

Watch Nancy Roach tell AACR members and advocates how they can join the effort for cancer research funding. Speaking at the 2011 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, Nancy said, If public funding for biomedical research matters to you, get involved. Nancy represented the voice of advocates in an AACR discussion of The Outlook for Cancer Research Funding in the Coming Years: The Importance of Advocacy and Government Relations. She was joined by former Illinois Congressman John Edward Porter, Shannon K. Bell from the NCI Office of Advocacy Relations, and Jon G. Retzlaff who is the managing director of Science Policy and Government Affairs for AACR. You

Chung’s Novel Hedgehog Pathway Research Benefits from Lisa Fund

The 2011 Fight Colorectal Cancer-AACR Fellowship, in memory of Lisa Dubow, has been awarded to Jon H. Chung, PhD  from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His proposed research is Hedgehog Pathway Targeted Therapeutics for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer. With the award, Dr. Chung will study alternatives to the traditional Hedgehog signaling pathway in colon cancer cells.  He will explore crosstalk within the cell between the Hedgehog and Wnt pathways and screen for drugs that block both pathways at the same time, potentially stopping cancer development.

Chung's Novel Hedgehog Pathway Research Benefits from Lisa Fund

The 2011 Fight Colorectal Cancer-AACR Fellowship, in memory of Lisa Dubow, has been awarded to Jon H. Chung, PhD  from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His proposed research is Hedgehog Pathway Targeted Therapeutics for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer. With the award, Dr. Chung will study alternatives to the traditional Hedgehog signaling pathway in colon cancer cells.  He will explore crosstalk within the cell between the Hedgehog and Wnt pathways and screen for drugs that block both pathways at the same time, potentially stopping cancer development.

Improved Stool Screening Test Finds DNA Changes

Too many people avoid colonoscopy.  Too invasive, they say.  Too scary, too risky. There may be an answer for them in an improved stool test that looks for DNA that is changed in both colorectal cancer and some precancerous polyps. Of course, if the stool test identifies possible polyps or cancer, a colonoscopy is critical to evaluate the findings and remove polyps. The test that looks for methylated DNA in human feces, found 85 percent of cancers and 64 percent of large adenomas.  There were few false positives.  Only one in ten follow-up colonoscopies didn’t confirm cancer or adenomas.

Lisa Dubow Research Fellows at AACR 2010

Both Dr. Jeffrey Chou and Dr. Yaguang Xi presented research posters at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting in Washington this week. Dr. Chou is the 2009 Lisa Dubow Research Fellow, and Dr. Xi received the award in 2008. Dr. Xi’s research found a micro-RNA (miRNA) that made colorectal cancer cells more sensitive to 5-FU and also predicted which cells, and potentially which patients, response best to treatment with 5-FU. Dr. Chou studied whether treating colorectal cancer cells with decitabine (DAC) could produce cancer-testis antigen in the cells and make them sensitive to immunotherapy.

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