Tag Archives: Avastin

Highlights from ASCO 2011

While there weren’t new blockbuster announcements for colorectal cancer this year at the American Society for Clinical Oncology’s (ASCO) Annual Meeting, there was plenty of focus on making what we already have work better and on choosing the patients who will benefit the most from treatments, as well as those who might not be helped at all. (Note, many of these issues will be discussed in detail on our upcoming patient webinar.) Highlights: While adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU improves five year survival slightly for stage II colon cancer, it increases side effects, particularly tingling and numbness in the feet.  An analysis of several NSABP trials found that two or three

Leading GI Cancer Researcher Updates Patients

Last night, Dr. Edith Mitchell of Thomas Jefferson University Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia, PA, updated colorectal cancer patients on the latest research and treatment news in an online webinar. Dr. Mitchell highlighted the most important news for colon and rectal cancer patients to come from the 2011 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium held in San Francisco last month. She answer such questions as… “Can doctors determine the chances that my cancer may return?” “Can my doctors determine if I need chemotherapy?” “Does Avastin or Erbitux benefit my stage III cancer treatment?” “Are there any promising new treatments on the horizon?”

AVANT Says No Avastin Benefit in Stage III Colon Cancer

A second randomized clinical trial has confirmed what the first one found — adding Avastin to standard chemotherapy does not reduce recurrences after surgery for stage III colon cancer. The AVANT trial compared standard FOLFOX chemotherapy to either FOLFOX plus Avastin® (bevacizumab) or XELOX plus Avastin.  Chemo was given for 6 months, and Avastin was added during that time and for another 6 months after chemo ended. Nearly 2,870 stage III patients took part in the study. Like in the C-08 trial, there was a temporary benefit during the year that patients got Avastin, but it didn’t last.  By the end of three years the percentage of people who were

Second Avastin Trial Shows No Benefit in Early Stage Colon Cancer

Adding Avastin® (bevacizumab) to chemotherapy for early stage colon cancer didn’t reduce the risk that cancer would return. In fact, preliminary results of the AVANT trial found that chemotherapy alone worked better in preventing recurrences of stage III and high-risk stage II colon cancer, according to a news release from Roche, sponsors of the international clinical trial. This is the second trial in which adding Avastin to chemotherapy after surgery for early stage colon cancer failed to show a disease-free survival benefit.  The C-08 trial found that, although Avastin did improve disease-free survival during the first year of treatment, the benefit had disappeared by the third year. The results of

Afinitor Combined with Avastin Promises Help for Advanced Colorectal Cancer

Some colorectal cancer patients whose tumors had gotten worse on all standard treatments benefited from a combination of Afinitor® (everolimus) and Avastin® (bevacizumab) during a small trial reported at the 2010 ASCO Annual meeting in Chicago. While no tumors got smaller on the treatment, about half of patients in the Phase II trial had their cancer remain stable for six months or more.  Three patients have had stable disease for more than a year. Seven out of ten patients in the trial had at least one serious side effect.  The most common was hypertension, but there were several bowel abscesses or fistulas and one case of bowel perforation.  There was

Avastin Helps Patients Maintain Chemotherapy Effectiveness

It doesn’t hurt to stop XELOX chemotherapy combined with Avastin after six treatments and continue with Avastin alone until colorectal cancer gets worse, according to a study reported at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago. Many patients have to stop oxaliplatin chemotherapy with before getting its maximum effectiveness because of peripheral neuropathy — tingling, numbness, or pain in their hands and feet.  Xeloda® (capecitabine) can cause painful skin redness and cracking on the hands and feet or hand-foot syndrome, which can also affect time on chemotherapy. Giving only six treatments of Avastin® (bevacizumab) plus XELOX chemotherapy and then stopping XELOX and using only

Continuing Avastin after Colorectal Cancer Gets Worse Increases Survival Time

Colorectal cancer patients benefited when they continued to include Avastin® (bevacizumab) in their chemotherapy plan after their cancer got worse after initial treatment. They lived longer after beginning a second round of chemotherapy with Avastin than did other patients who got chemo without Avastin or those who didn’t get any chemotherapy at all. The results are based on the ARIES study which observed patients after cancer progressed after either first or second line chemotherapy with Avastin.  The analysis will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology in June.

Colorectal Cancer News In Brief: December 4

Briefly: A video can help patients make personal decisions about end-of-life care.  Cancer death rates are falling in Europe, partly led by recent colorectal cancer declines. Avastin will now be covered for a longer time for people with advanced colorectal cancer in Ontario.  The Wellness Community in Valley/Ventura, California has a free workshop scheduled for December 19th featuring Dr. Heinz-Josef Lenz.

Avastin Effective for Older Patients

Colorectal cancer patients 65 and older without other serious medical problems benefitted when Avastin® (bevacizumab) was added to chemotherapy. Combining results of four randomized clinical trials of Avastin and chemotherapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer, researchers found that adding Avastin increased both the time older patients lived and the time before their cancer got worse. Patients who were 70 and older had similar improvements.

Colorectal Cancer News in Brief: July 31

Get help managing the financial costs of your cancer care from an ASCO booklet or figure out how to deal with the Medicare prescription doughnut hole using an AARP online calculator. In research, Lynch syndrome women have excellent survival after ovarian cancer, older patients have similar effectiveness and side effects from Avastin, and parents with advanced cancer often underestimate how upset their children are.  Long-term cancer survivors have no more depression than people without cancer.

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