Tag Archives: Carlea Bauman

President Carlea Bauman to Leave Fight Colorectal Cancer

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Sep. 23, 2013 - ALEXANDRIA, Va. – President Carlea Bauman announced Monday that she will be leaving Fight Colorectal Cancer. She will be joining The Global Resource for Advancing Cancer Education as its first executive director. Current Vice President of Programs, Anjee Davis, will serve as interim executive director as the board of directors considers future leadership needs. “Carlea turned Fight Colorectal Cancer into an advocacy powerhouse,” said Nancy Roach, founder and chair of the board. “Our policy work and grassroots energy have directly impacted access to screening and research funding. I’ll miss Carlea and wish her the very best in her future.” Bauman joined Fight Colorectal Cancer (formerly C3 – Colorectal

Thank You For Seven Great Years

Seven years. That’s how long I’ve been at the helm of Fight Colorectal Cancer as its president. My experience with cancer seven years ago was limited to my father’s very brief and devastating fight with lung cancer and myelodysplatic syndrome. But since then, I’ve testified before Congress and the Food and Drug Administration, traveled to Europe to meet with international cancer activists, rang the Opening Bell at the New York Stock Exchange and the Opening and Closing Bells at NASDAQ, railed against Dr. Oz, led Fight Colorectal Cancer through a rebranding, met some amazing advocates, and lost some dear friends, board members (one of whom was a tremendous mentor to

President Obama’s State of the Union Address

This evening, the President gave his annual address to Congress and called for a freeze in domestic spending while at the same time calling for innovation and acknowledging the importance of biomedical research. “As someone who is committed to winning the fight against cancer, I was pleased to hear the President talk about the importance of innovation. However, it is counterproductive to proclaim that ‘this is our generation’s Sputnik moment’ while calling for a spending freeze for domestic programs. Now is not the time for across the board cuts to domestic spending. If we are going to find a cure for cancer in our lifetimes, we need a sustained investment

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