Tag Archives: CDC

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What’s Preventing Prevention? – A Recap from the Alliance for Health Reform/AARP Hill briefing

What’s Preventing Prevention? – A Recap from the Alliance for Health Reform/AARP Hill briefing

by Margaret Carvin, Fight Colorectal Cancer Policy Strategist Colorectal Cancer prevention and screening was discussed extensively at a senate lunch briefing last week by several panelists. CDC’s CRCCP Program Explained Judy Monroe, from Centers for Disease Control, discussed the Colorectal Cancer Control Program. She explained that this program covers 25 states and 4 Indian tribes. Two-thirds of the money of this program goes to “evidence-based screening” which includes outreach through media, provider reminders, etc. The other third of the money is designated for outreach to underserved populations. She discussed the great successes that have occurred from appropriate screenings and the goal to reach 80 percent of those eligible for screening colonoscopies by 2018. AARP Endorses H.R. 1070!

CDC: More Americans Need Colorectal Cancer Screening

Since the first day we opened our doors as an advocacy group, we have supported and advocated for Centers for Disease Control (CDC) funding. The CDC is the cornerstone of our country’s cancer prevention efforts, saving the lives of Americans and keeping a watchful eye on our country’s disparate populations. The CDC is at the front lines. CDC: A Leader in Cancer Control We see the CDC as a leader in cancer control. This group develops and implements effective, evidence-based cancer prevention programs. In the last five years, the Colorectal Cancer Prevention and Control Program (CRCCP) has increased access to screening and improved diagnostic care, case management and treatment referral

Oregon Advocates Meet at White House

Yesterday two of our long-time colorectal cancer advocates, LaRisha and Michell Baker, along with president Carlea Bauman and policy expert Camille Bonta, met with Tricia Schmitt at the White House. Ms. Schmitt met with our advocates to discuss funding for colorectal cancer programs at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC.)   Our team, joined by two gastroenterologists, met at the White House to talk about the importance of maintaining the funding for lifesaving programs like the CDC’s Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP)  currently in 26 states and four tribes. As co-chairs of the cancer control committee in Oregon, the Baker sisters gave first-hand stories and statistics about the importance funding of CDC in Oregon. The

What’s Happening on Capitol Hill? May 2013 Update

Dear Advocates, Your efforts are making an impact. Every time you exercise your right as a US citizen to communicate with Congress, you are changing the landscape for colorectal cancer patients. We applaud you for your passion and advocacy. Has Your Representative Cosponsored H.R. 1070? ACTION REQUESTED Rep. Charlie Dent (R-PA) introduced on March 15 the “Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act,” (H.R. 1070).The bill would waive Medicare beneficiary coinsurance for colorectal cancer screening colonoscopy when a polyp is removed.  As of May 16, the bill had 28 cosponsors. To find out if your representative has cosponsored H.R. 1070 go to www.thomas.gov and search by bill number.  If your

Too Many Colonoscopies in Over-75s?

A study published in the March 11 JAMA-Internal Medicine suggests that 23 percent of over-75-year-olds have colonoscopies that may be “potentially inappropriate” according to national guidelines which include an upper age limit, as well as how often negative colonoscopies should be repeated. In a retrospective population study, University of Texas researchers looked at billings for 100 percent of colonoscopies performed in Medicare beneficiaries in Texas who were aged 70 years and older who had a colonoscopy in 2008 or 2009. They also examined a nationwide sample of 5% of Medicare claims. Colonscopies were classified as “screening” if records (including claims from 2000 to 2009) did not indicate a diagnosis, or

New Strain of Stomach Bug Spreads in U.S.

A new virus causing diarrhea and vomiting has spread rapidly nationwide, causing an increasing number of outbreaks of what many call the “stomach flu,” according to a Jan. 24 2013 report issued by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control). The new norovirus strain (named GII.4 Sydney) is highly contagious, and seems to cause more hospitalizations than other gastrointestinal viruses. It hits suddenly with diarrhea, abdominal pain, vomiting, fever, chills, and headache. Most people get better in one or two days, after the stomach or intestinal inflammation eases, but they are still contagious for 3 more days..   Dehydration is Danger Even healthy people can get dehydrated with this illness if you

CDC Urges MDs to Give More Antiviral Treatment for Flu Cases

The Centers for Disease Control is urging doctors to prescribe antiviral medications to high-risk patients suspected of having the flu, even without a positive test. When given within 48 hours of symptoms appearing, antivirals like Tamiflu or Relenza can ease symptoms, shorten illness, and prevent serious complications. Clinicians are not prescribing antiviral medications as often as in previous years, even though the 2013 flu season is causing more hospitalizations and deaths according to government figures. Complications from this year’s predominant flu strain are especially high among the elderly, causing half of hospitalizations and 90% of deaths so far. With a sharp increase in both hospitalizations and deaths in the 2nd week

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