Tag Archives: chemotherapy

Meet the One Million Strong – Deborah Anders from Texas

Be a part of One Million Strong and tell us how colorectal cancer has impacted your life! Share your story now!  MEET DEBORAH Deborah Anders, Survivor From Austin, TX DEBORAH’S STORY I am a stage IV colorectal cancer survivor going on 6 years this May. I have been through fours kinds of chemotherapy and  seven surgeries.  I lost my dad 31 years ago and  my mother four months before me to lung and brain cancer. I have four grown kids that need to learn more about colorectal cancer and being tested. DEBORAH’S ADVICE Surround yourself with positive, loving support groups and educate yourself. This is not an old persons disease. WHAT

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Meet the One Million Strong – Gordon C. from North Carolina

Be a part of One Million Strong and tell us how colorectal cancer has impacted your life! Share your story now!  MEET GORDON Gordon Cole, Survivor Greensboro, NC GORDON’S STORY Following his diagnosis of stage IV colorectal cancer in August 2003, Gordon has received radiation treatment, almost constant chemotherapy, a colon resection, two liver resections, RFA, a clinical trial (at Duke), two lung resections, and continuing maintenance chemo, along with a prostate cancer diagnosis in late ’06. He has participated in a clinical trial, and is still in treatment following a recurrence and side effects from radiation damage requiring surgeries, using his research knowledge to monitor his own treatment. He has

Stage II Colon Cancer – Chemo or No Chemo?

A brief in a running series from 2013 ASCO® conference: Prognostic Tests – to use or not use . . .  or rather  … To treat or not to treat? New studies for stage II colon cancer patients contemplating chemotherapy . by: Nancy Roach One of the toughest decisions for patients with stage II colon cancer is whether or not to receive chemotherapy after surgery. In a perfect world, there would be a test that could predict whether or not the cancer will reoccur and research to predict which treatment will help each patient at risk. For now, each patient’s decision is based on a wide variety of factors. Tests to

Experts Issue Practice-Changing Advice: Stop giving calcium/magnesium for oxaliplatin-caused neuropathy

For patients getting the common FOLFOX chemotherapy for colorectal cancer, many oncologists add intravenous calcium and magnesium, hoping to decrease the neuropathy (nerve damage) associated with oxaliplatin-based drugs. But this week, experts at the 2013 ASCO meeting (American Society of Clinical Oncology), announced strong evidence that the calcium/magnesium does no good in either preventing or decreasing neuropathy—and it should no longer be part of routine treatment. Neuropathy affects cancer treatment Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy (e.g. FOLFOX, with Eloxatin®) is one of the most commonly used drugs for people having high-risk stage II, or stages III or IV colorectal cancer. But far too often after patients have had many doses of FOLFOX over

FDA Approves Regorafenib for Metastatic CRC

  The FDA today approved the use of the drug regorafenib (brand name Stivarga) for patients whose metastatic colorectal cancer has progressed despite all currently approved treatment regimens. This is the second new drug approved by the FDA recently after a drought of 5 years in approving new treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Regorafenib was placed into the  FDA’s “fast-track” approval process after the international, multicenter Phase III CORRECT trial  showed improved survival (from 5 to 6.4 months) in all mCRC patients, including those having both non-mutated and mutated KRAS types.

To fast or not to fast

TO EAT OR NOT TO EAT…DURING CHEMOTHERAPY To humbly paraphrase Shakespeare, the question is “whether ‘tis better to…ban sugar from your diet, or bulk up on high-protein meals…” The internet is full of raging debates, fervid testimonials and opinions about what you should or shouldn’t eat when you’re being treated for cancer.  One of the most common chat topics is whether you should cut out ‘sugar’ to decrease the amount of “fuel” available for voracious cancer cells. If only cancer, and nutrition, were so simple. But every kind of calorie is fuel, every cell uses fuel, and cells become cancerous in many different ways.   But thankfully, scientists are working hard

Watch our Webinar on Drug Shortages

On Wednesday night, Dr. Lindsey Poppe, the Pharmacy Clinical Manager for Oncology for the University of North Carolina hospital system talked about the alternatives and options that patients have when directly faced with the current chemo drug shortage. You can watch a recording of the webinar on our website, along with all of our past patient webinars. Webinar: What to Do When Your Doc is Out of 5-FU from Fight Colorectal Cancer on Vimeo.

Leading GI Cancer Researcher Updates Patients

Last night, Dr. Edith Mitchell of Thomas Jefferson University Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia, PA, updated colorectal cancer patients on the latest research and treatment news in an online webinar. Dr. Mitchell highlighted the most important news for colon and rectal cancer patients to come from the 2011 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium held in San Francisco last month. She answer such questions as… “Can doctors determine the chances that my cancer may return?” “Can my doctors determine if I need chemotherapy?” “Does Avastin or Erbitux benefit my stage III cancer treatment?” “Are there any promising new treatments on the horizon?”

How Real is Chemobrain?

Very real. Brain MRI’s before and chemotherapy found changes in brains of women being treated for breast cancer. Women who had breast cancer surgery but didn’t have chemo had similar changes, but they were less severe. Brains of healthy women remained stable. Changes were in gray matter in areas of the brain involving memory and the ability to process information. A year later most– but not all — areas of the brain had returned to normal.

Avastin Helps Patients Maintain Chemotherapy Effectiveness

It doesn’t hurt to stop XELOX chemotherapy combined with Avastin after six treatments and continue with Avastin alone until colorectal cancer gets worse, according to a study reported at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago. Many patients have to stop oxaliplatin chemotherapy with before getting its maximum effectiveness because of peripheral neuropathy — tingling, numbness, or pain in their hands and feet.  Xeloda® (capecitabine) can cause painful skin redness and cracking on the hands and feet or hand-foot syndrome, which can also affect time on chemotherapy. Giving only six treatments of Avastin® (bevacizumab) plus XELOX chemotherapy and then stopping XELOX and using only

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