Tag Archives: colonoscopy

Get a Loved One Screened with an E-Card

Know someone who needs to be screened for colorectal cancer? Send a gentle e-reminder with a card from the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. You can add your own message and Help Catch a Killer. Other information about colorectal cancer, screening, and colonoscopy, including videos, is available from ASGE on the Screen4ColonCancer web site.

FIT Beats All Other Screening for Effectiveness and Cost

In a computer simulation, FIT — fecal immunochemical testing — done every year saved more lives and cost the least of any colorectal cancer screening method, including colonoscopy. The computer model looked at 100,000 average risk people and compared screening methods results for number of colorectal cancer cases number of colorectal cancer deaths cost of screening and treating colorectal cancer for each screened person Compared to not screening at all, annual FIT  could save 3 out of 4 deaths from colorectal cancer. For every 100,000 people between 50 and 75, nearly 3,500 people wouldn’t get colorectal cancer, and over 1,300 wouldn’t die. Not only did FIT screening save the most

Half of Colorectal Cancer Survivors Not Getting Recommended Colonoscopies

Despite guidelines calling for a colonoscopy a year after surgery for colon or rectal cancer, less than half of patients have had one 14 months after colorectal surgery intended to cure their cancer. A study of stage I, II, and III colorectal cancer patients in the United States found that only 49 percent had received the recommended colonoscopy. Currently follow-up guidelines call for a surveillance colonoscopy to look for local cancer recurrence or new polyps or cancers a year after surgery.  If that exam is normal, another colonoscopy is called for three years later and then every five years. 

More Choices Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Use

When people were offered a personal choice of either FOBT or colonoscopy screening by their primary care provider, more actually completed the test they chose than if only one option was offered. In a study of  1,000 ethnically and racially diverse people, the lowest percentage had a colonoscopy when that was the only test offered.  More completed fecal occult blood testing if it was the single choice. Overall 65 percent of the 1,000 patients studied were screened after their doctor recommended testing.

Nurses Endoscopists Can Perform Colonoscopy Safely and Effectively

Nurses and other health professionals may be necessary to meet demand for colonoscopies as colorectal cancer screening programs grow to meet needs.  Being sure that they can meet standards for quality exams is critical. In the Netherlands, five nurse endoscopists were trained to do colonoscopies under the supervision of a senior gastroenterologist. Each  had 100 consecutive procedures evaluated for both quality and patient satisfaction. During the study their exams met international standards for quality, and 95 percent of patients said that, overall, they were satisfied with their experience.

Annual Colonoscopy for Lynch Syndrome

Annual colonoscopies for people with Lynch syndrome (HNPCC or hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer) successfully find cancers at an early stage. A recent study by the German HNPCC Consortium confirmed the effectiveness of annual colonoscopies to find colorectal cancers at a curable stage.  Regular colonoscopies found early cancers more often than did patient symptoms. Current recommendations are for surveillance colonoscopies to begin by age 25, be repeated every 1 to 2 years until age 40, and then annually.

Miss Harry's Live Colonoscopy? You Can See It Now.

Harry Smith’s Early Show colonoscopy is being replayed on CBS.com. You can watch Harry and Katie Couric the day before the test discuss the prep and talk about saving lives by finding polyps. This morning, Katie is in the procedure room with Harry and the medical staff. Dr. Mark Pochapin demonstrates how the colonoscope works to view the colon, snare polyps if they are found, and remove them. As Dr. Pochapin withdraws the scope, Harry is awake but comfortable, talking and asking questions.  Dr. Pochapin explains what he is seeing on the video monitor in Harry’s colon. Afterwards, Harry said, “Piece of cake!  You have a tremendous peace of mind.”

Experts Recommend Changes for Colorectal Screening Access and Quality

The first priority of an expert panel looking at increasing the number of people being screened for colorectal cancer was to “Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow up.” Meeting for two days in Washington in February, a National Institutes of Health State-of-the-Science conference considered what is known– and not known– about why people choose or avoid screening, how to improve screening quality, and what the healthcare capacity is to deliver colorectal cancer screening to the US population. At the end of the meeting, the panel released a consensus statement with their recommendations for enhancing the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening.

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