Giving Patients a Screening Choice Matters

When patients  were offered a choice of colorectal cancer screening with either FOBT or colonoscopy, they were significantly more likely to complete that screening than when their doctors recommended only FOBT or only colonoscopy. Nearly 1000 racially and ethnically diverse patients in urban primary care practices were randomly assigned to get colorectal cancer screening via: Fecal occult…  Read More

Do You Need that Test? Wise Choices from Gastroenterologists

How soon should average risk people get another colorectal cancer screening after they have a normal colonoscopy? No sooner than 10 years, the American Gastroenterological Association recommends as part of the Choosing Wisely campaign. The AGA’s list of Five Things Physicians and Patients Should Question includes: Use the lowest possible effective dose of acid reducing medicines…  Read More

The Calls to Congress are done – for now, but Support of H.R. 4120 still needed

Seniors’ access to a screening colonoscopy is at risk and YOU can help! We need you to continue to add your voice and urge your Representative to support H.R. 4120! Simply submit an Action Alert. H.R. 4120, the Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act of 2012, will fix a regulation that requires Medicare beneficiaries to pay…  Read More

New Bill in Congress Aims to Save Seniors' Lives

Legislation was introduced in Congress today that will correct an oversight to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that requires Medicare beneficiaries to pay coinsurance when their screening colonoscopy also involves the removal of a polyp or cancer. When a screening colonoscopy turns therapeutic, the cost to the Medicare patient is significant – $100 to $300 –…  Read More

William I. Wolff, Colonoscopy Pioneer

Dr. William Wolff died on August 20 at his home Manhattan.  He was 94. In the mid 1960’s Dr. Wolff, working with his colleague Dr. Hiromi Shinya at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York, began studying how fiber optics and a long, soft, flexible tube might make it possible to see inside the entire length…  Read More

Poor Bowel Preps Mean Missed Polyps

When bowel preps are not good, doctors may miss almost half of adenomas (polyps) during colonoscopy.  Worse, they may miss nearly 1 in 3 large adenomas, the most worrisome kind. The bad news is that bowel prep may be suboptimal in as many of one in four patients. Because of the danger of missing an adenoma…  Read More