Tag Archives: colonoscopy screening

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Meet the One Million Strong – Marcia M from West Virginia

Meet the One Million Strong – Marcia M from West Virginia

Be a part of One Million Strong and tell us how colorectal cancer has impacted your life! Share your story now!  MEET MARCIA Marcia Mullins, Survivor Huntington, WV MARCIA’S STORY Despite Katie Couric’s warning, when I turned 50 I declined to have a colonoscopy, I didn’t think I was at risk. When I had symptoms at 57, I used hemorrhoid cream and tried to ignore them. Right after my 58th birthday, I had a rectal hemorrhage and was admitted to the hospital for a colonoscopy the next morning. It was not hemorrhoids. It was stage IIIc rectal cancer. After lots of chemo, radiation and surgery, I am now in remission. I could have avoided it

Too Many Colonoscopies in Over-75s?

A study published in the March 11 JAMA-Internal Medicine suggests that 23 percent of over-75-year-olds have colonoscopies that may be “potentially inappropriate” according to national guidelines which include an upper age limit, as well as how often negative colonoscopies should be repeated. In a retrospective population study, University of Texas researchers looked at billings for 100 percent of colonoscopies performed in Medicare beneficiaries in Texas who were aged 70 years and older who had a colonoscopy in 2008 or 2009. They also examined a nationwide sample of 5% of Medicare claims. Colonscopies were classified as “screening” if records (including claims from 2000 to 2009) did not indicate a diagnosis, or

Partial Fix for Unexpected Colonoscopy Charges

Some people who go in for a routine screening colonoscopy (fully covered by most insurance) can end up with a surprise bill of several hundred dollars, if the doctor detected and removed one or more polyps. Under current law, Medicare beneficiaries must pay a coinsurance when their screening colonoscopy also involves the removal of polyps or other tissue—because it is reclassified as a “treatment” procedure. Additionally, while current law also requires most private payers to cover colorectal cancer screenings without cost-sharing (copays/ coinsurance/ deductible), private payers have interpreted the rules differently. Some private payers waive cost- sharing when a screening involves the removal of polyps or other tissue; others do not.

Detailing Inconsistencies On Who Has to Pay for Their Polyps

The Kaiser Family Foundation, working with the American Cancer Society and the National Colorectal Cancer Round Table, today released results of its investigation into the problem of patients being billed unexpectedly for costs of colonoscopies initiated at routine screening tests. Fight Colorectal Cancer was one of the organizations that contributed to the report. One way the new federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) aims to reduce medical spending is to improve cost-effective screening that prevents or detects diseases before they become complicated and expensive to treat. But consumer complaints reveal that, for screening colonoscopies in particular, consumers are getting unexpected bills when insurers decide their colonoscopies were no longer “screening” procedures. Instead

Wanted: 100 U.S. Representatives

H.R. 4120 has 37 cosponsors, but your help is needed to push the number to 100 by the end of September. Colorectal cancer screening is covered under Medicare without cost sharing (or co-pay), but if a Medicare patient undergoes a screening colonoscopy during which a polyp or other tissue is removed, that patient is required to pay. This policy is unfair, confusing and deters individuals from receiving a test that could save their lives. Earlier this year, H.R. 4120, the ‘‘Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act of 2012,” was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Rep. Charlie Dent (R-PA). H.R. 4120 would waive a Medicare beneficiary’s coinsurance

Fighting Colorectal Cancer on Many Fronts

Indran Krishnan, MD, FRCP (London), FRCP(C), FACP, FACG is fighting colorectal cancer on many fronts. As a gastroenterologist, he personally screens people every week. As an associate professor at Emory University, he trains the next generation of physicians. As an advocate, he serves on Fight Colorectal Cancer’s Board of Directors, and was a founding member of the Georgia Colon Cancer Coalition. In the first 4 months of 2012, Indran stepped up his efforts by: Meeting with Georgia Governor Nathan Deal and members of the Georgia legislature to introduce them to Fight Colorectal Cancer and spread the word about screening; Attending this year’s Call-on Congress, our annual advocacy training and lobby

The Calls to Congress are done – for now, but Support of H.R. 4120 still needed

Seniors’ access to a screening colonoscopy is at risk and YOU can help! We need you to continue to add your voice and urge your Representative to support H.R. 4120! Simply submit an Action Alert. H.R. 4120, the Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act of 2012, will fix a regulation that requires Medicare beneficiaries to pay coinsurance when their screening colonoscopy involves the removal of a polyp. The current policy can cost patients $100 to $300 and serve as a deterrent to screening. We need cosponsors for this legislation if it is to pass into law & YOU can help!

CBS Early Show Anchor Harry Smith to Have Colonoscopy On-Air

Anchor Harry Smith will have a colonoscopy live on the CBS Early Show March 10.  He plans to tell viewers about the procedure while it is happening. Evening News anchor and managing editor Katie Couric will be with Smith during the colonoscopy and as he prepares for it the night before. Gastroenterologist Dr. Mark Pochapin will do the procedure at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

Colonoscopy Prevents Cancers in Left Side of Colon

While colonoscopy is effective in preventing cancers and advanced polyps in the lower part of the colon and rectum, it is less successful in stopping them in the right side or upper colon. Looking back at almost 3,300 colonoscopies performed in community gastroenterology practices in Germany, researchers found a substantial reduction in large polyps or cancers in the left side of the colon and rectum among patients who had had a colonoscopy in the past ten years compared to those who hadn’t had one. However, in the upper part of the colon, risk for an advanced polyp or cancer was the same whether or not the patient had a previous

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