Tag Archives: colorectal cancer

Diet and Exercise Habits Strongly Related to Higher Rates of CRC in People with Lower Education and/or Income

Fewer people in the U.S. are getting colorectal cancer (CRC), but that progress is seen much more often in well-off and highly educated Americans. In fact, the gap is widening in rate of colorectal deaths in people with less education and/or who live in deeply disadvantaged communities. Researchers now have shown that differences in weight, diet and physical activity play a huge role in the higher rates and deaths from CRC among people of lower socioeconomic status. In a paper published in the Sept. 4 2012 Journal of the National Cancer Institute, a careful statistical analysis of  a 10-year observational study of a half-million people indicated that helping people of lower

Q&A with Hope Through Grace’s Founder and Board Chair Grace Butler Ph.D

Grace Butler, Ph.D, had done everything right.  She exercised regularly, ate healthy meals, and had an annual FOBT test, a sigmoidoscopy, and barium enema exams.  But no one told her she needed a colonoscopy – and that oversight led to her diagnosis of stage III colon cancer in 1999. Butler spoke to Fight Colorectal Cancer recently about the diagnosis that changed her life and how she’s extending hope in the fight against colorectal cancer to Texans without insurance. Before your diagnosis, how would you describe your life? I had a wonderfully blessed life before cancer. I am an educator, and I started my career as a band and orchestra teacher

No More Room in the Bucket

[Our dear friend and advocate Pat Steer passed away on July 17, 2012. This was the last blog post she wrote for us.] My friend Janet asked me last week if there were still things I wished I could do, any unfinished things on my bucket list. I thought for a minute before I said, “No.” I’m sure Janet expected something like a wish to visit the Grand Canyon or take that cross-country sleeper train trip I’d always promised myself. What I really wanted to say, the first thing that came to mind: “I want to be strong enough to go upstairs and do a load of laundry.” Inconsequential as

Does Colorectal Cancer Run in Your Family?

The short answer is probably not. Most colorectal cancer develops as we age without any notable family history. But about one in five people with colorectal cancer will have a close family link. Getting to know that risk is important. It may mean earlier or more frequent screening. It definitely means talking to your family, learning about Aunt Mary’s uterine cancer, Dad’s polyps, or Grandmother’s stomach problems when she was 35. It means telling them about your own cancer or polyps. The National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable has a new website to help you search and share your family history with Family PLZ.

It's Finally Here! Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Time to splash Blue all over! Today is the first day of March and the first day of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. March is full of Blue Awareness, nationally and locally. Spread the message that colorectal cancer is preventable, treatable, and beatable. Don’t hide your story! Tell your family, tell your friends, tell your coworkers. Get them screened, teach them the symptoms. Get them involved.

It’s Finally Here! Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Time to splash Blue all over! Today is the first day of March and the first day of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. March is full of Blue Awareness, nationally and locally. Spread the message that colorectal cancer is preventable, treatable, and beatable. Don’t hide your story! Tell your family, tell your friends, tell your coworkers. Get them screened, teach them the symptoms. Get them involved.

Can We Fix Racial Gaps in Colorectal Cancer Death Rates?

Before 1980, colorectal cancer death rates were actually higher for whites than African Americans. But, as rates began falling in the 1980′s for both blacks and white patients, decreases for whites were substantially greater than those for blacks.  Between 1985 and 2008, mortality rates for whites with colorectal cancer fell 40 percent, while black rates declined by less than 20 percent. The decrease in black death rates was higher than those for whites at every stage at diagnosis, but strikingly different when cancer had spread to distant sites.   For whites whose colon or rectal cancer was first found at stage IV, death rates fell by more than 30 percent, while

What Does Health Care Reform Mean for People Concerned About Colorectal Cancer?

This morning, the President signed into law the biggest transformation of our health care system in decades.  The law includes a number of provisions that will help individuals diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer. Although many of the provisions of the new law are phased in to take effect gradually until the entire law is implemented in 2018, some benefits will be available immediately. Highlights of the provisions that will benefit individuals people facing cancer treatment include: prohibiting insurance companies from dropping patients who become sick; eliminating lifetime and annual limits on coverage; prohibiting insurance companies from denying coverage because of pre-existing conditions; and limits on on out-of-pocket expenses. You

Aspirin Saves Lives after Colon Cancer Treatment

Colorectal cancer patients with early stage disease were 30 percent less likely to die from cancer and 20 percent less likely to die at all if they took aspirin regularly after their diagnosis. Benefit was even greater for those who began taking the medicine for the first time after their diagnosis. However, only the group whose tumors tested positive for COX-2 (cyclooxygenase2) benefited from aspirin.  

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