Tag Archives: colorectal cancer

High Carb Diets Newly Linked With Higher Colorectal Cancer Recurrence

By Curt Pesman Low-carb (and lower sugar) diets may soon look a lot better to colorectal cancer survivors. In a recent data-rich study of more than 1000 stage III colon cancer survivors, researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute found that those who consistently ate a high-carbohydrate, sugar-laden diet appeared to have markedly higher recurrence rates of their disease than patients whose diets were more varied and contained less-sugar. The results were published in the Nov. 7 Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The main finding after surveying and following 1,011 patients during and 6 months after chemotherapy? That those who reported having the highest dietary levels of carbohydrate intake (and related

Should All Colorectal Tumors Be Tested for Lynch Syndrome?

An international study described in the Oct. 17 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that universal tumor testing in all newly diagnosed colorectal patients produced a “modest increase” in finding people with Lynch syndrome. One in every 35 people with colorectal cancer has Lynch syndrome – an inherited genetic mutation which greatly increases the person’s chance of developing colorectal cancer more than once, plus other cancers (stomach, pancreas, urinary system, brain or skin cancers). Women with Lynch syndrome also face a 40-60 percent chance of developing endometrial (uterine) cancer in their lifetime and an increased risk for ovarian cancer. Until genetic tests of tumors became available in recent

Circulating Tumor Cells And CEA Levels Help Predict Survival in Metastatic CRC

Circulating tumor cells (rare cells from a cancerous tumor that appear in the bloodstream) can help predict how a person with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) might do over time. A study published in the October 2012 Annals of Oncology compared levels of CTCs with levels of CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) to see how the two tests compared or could be used together to predict survival times in metastatis CRC. Results in 217 patients with metastatic CRC showed that at the beginning of treatment, CTC numbers alone–not CEA levels–could accurately predict length of survival. But when patients had a high initial level of CEA levels, adding the CTC number helped predict which patients would

Diet and Exercise Habits Strongly Related to Higher Rates of CRC in People with Lower Education and/or Income

Fewer people in the U.S. are getting colorectal cancer (CRC), but that progress is seen much more often in well-off and highly educated Americans. In fact, the gap is widening in rate of colorectal deaths in people with less education and/or who live in deeply disadvantaged communities. Researchers now have shown that differences in weight, diet and physical activity play a huge role in the higher rates and deaths from CRC among people of lower socioeconomic status. In a paper published in the Sept. 4 2012 Journal of the National Cancer Institute, a careful statistical analysis of  a 10-year observational study of a half-million people indicated that helping people of lower

Q&A with Hope Through Grace’s Founder and Board Chair Grace Butler Ph.D

Grace Butler, Ph.D, had done everything right.  She exercised regularly, ate healthy meals, and had an annual FOBT test, a sigmoidoscopy, and barium enema exams.  But no one told her she needed a colonoscopy – and that oversight led to her diagnosis of stage III colon cancer in 1999. Butler spoke to Fight Colorectal Cancer recently about the diagnosis that changed her life and how she’s extending hope in the fight against colorectal cancer to Texans without insurance. Before your diagnosis, how would you describe your life? I had a wonderfully blessed life before cancer. I am an educator, and I started my career as a band and orchestra teacher

No More Room in the Bucket

[Our dear friend and advocate Pat Steer passed away on July 17, 2012. This was the last blog post she wrote for us.] My friend Janet asked me last week if there were still things I wished I could do, any unfinished things on my bucket list. I thought for a minute before I said, “No.” I’m sure Janet expected something like a wish to visit the Grand Canyon or take that cross-country sleeper train trip I’d always promised myself. What I really wanted to say, the first thing that came to mind: “I want to be strong enough to go upstairs and do a load of laundry.” Inconsequential as

Does Colorectal Cancer Run in Your Family?

The short answer is probably not. Most colorectal cancer develops as we age without any notable family history. But about one in five people with colorectal cancer will have a close family link. Getting to know that risk is important. It may mean earlier or more frequent screening. It definitely means talking to your family, learning about Aunt Mary’s uterine cancer, Dad’s polyps, or Grandmother’s stomach problems when she was 35. It means telling them about your own cancer or polyps. The National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable has a new website to help you search and share your family history with Family PLZ.

It’s Finally Here! Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Time to splash Blue all over! Today is the first day of March and the first day of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. March is full of Blue Awareness, nationally and locally. Spread the message that colorectal cancer is preventable, treatable, and beatable. Don’t hide your story! Tell your family, tell your friends, tell your coworkers. Get them screened, teach them the symptoms. Get them involved.

It's Finally Here! Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Time to splash Blue all over! Today is the first day of March and the first day of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. March is full of Blue Awareness, nationally and locally. Spread the message that colorectal cancer is preventable, treatable, and beatable. Don’t hide your story! Tell your family, tell your friends, tell your coworkers. Get them screened, teach them the symptoms. Get them involved.

Can We Fix Racial Gaps in Colorectal Cancer Death Rates?

Before 1980, colorectal cancer death rates were actually higher for whites than African Americans. But, as rates began falling in the 1980′s for both blacks and white patients, decreases for whites were substantially greater than those for blacks.  Between 1985 and 2008, mortality rates for whites with colorectal cancer fell 40 percent, while black rates declined by less than 20 percent. The decrease in black death rates was higher than those for whites at every stage at diagnosis, but strikingly different when cancer had spread to distant sites.   For whites whose colon or rectal cancer was first found at stage IV, death rates fell by more than 30 percent, while

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