Cutting Out Polyps Cuts Colorectal Cancer Deaths in Half

We thought it was true . . . and now research comes along with evidence. Colonoscopy reduces death from colorectal cancer. In a follow-up analysis from the National Polyp Study, people who had adenomas — the risky kind of polyps — removed during the study were much less likely to die from colon or rectal cancer…  Read More

Judge Individual Risk Before Making CRC Screening Decisions

New guidance from the American College of Physicians advises doctors to evaluate each patient’s individual risk and base colorectal cancer screening on that assessment. The four point guidance statement says: Clinicians should perform an individual colorectal cancer risk assessment for all adults. Average risk adults should be screened at age 50. Individuals at high risk should…  Read More

Advice from Ms Butt Meddler — Start at 45

Ms. Butt Meddler, the singing and dancing gastroenterologist, tells African Americans to Start at 45. African Americans have a high rate of new colorectal cancers and they are diagnosed earlier in life. And their death rate is higher than the rest of the US population. The American College of Gastroenterology guidelines call for them to be…  Read More

Patient Navigators Boost CRC Screening Rates

A patient navigator who speaks the patient’s language and has time to spend answering questions and removing barriers makes a difference in whether that patient will get colorectal screening. A study in Boston randomly assigned community patient navigators to half of a diverse group of low-income patients who were behind in colorectal cancer screening.  Compared to…  Read More

Some People Getting Colonoscopy Screening Too Often

After a normal colonoscopy when no polyps are found, guidelines call for a repeat test in 10 years. However, almost half of Medicare patients with a negative colonoscopy got another exam within 7 years, and for one in four there was no clear evidence that they needed one. Because colonoscopies have real risks and are expensive,…  Read More