Screening Rates Go Down for American Indians and Alaska Natives

Colorectal cancer screening rates for colorectal cancer improved between 2000 and 2008 for white, black and Asian-Americans aged 50 and over—but barely improved for Hispanics and actually worsed for American Indians and Alaska Natives. The latest statistics, just reported by…  Read More

Aussie Study Supports National Screening Program

As the Australian government considers the future of its National Bowel Cancer Screening Program, Australian and US researchers provide compelling evidence of the cost-effectiveness of expanding the national screening program. Australia has one of the highest colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality…  Read More

Widespread Early Screening for Lynch Syndrome is Cost-Effective . . . and Saves Lives

If doctors ask  healthy people simple questions about cancers in their families, they can find people who are at increased risk for Lynch syndrome, an inherited condition that greatly increases risk for colorectal and uterine cancer. Doctors can use a…  Read More

FIT Beats All Other Screening for Effectiveness and Cost

In a computer simulation, FIT — fecal immunochemical testing — done every year saved more lives and cost the least of any colorectal cancer screening method, including colonoscopy. The computer model looked at 100,000 average risk people and compared screening…  Read More