Improved CRC screening results, challenges to reach Alaska Natives

Alaska Native Americans have a much higher rate of both colorectal cancer and resulting deaths than other populations—about twice those of the U.S. white population (age-adjusted) for the period of 2004 to 2008. They also have the highest rate of CRC cases of all Native American groups—nearly five times higher than American Indians living in the…  Read More

Can We Fix Racial Gaps in Colorectal Cancer Death Rates?

Before 1980, colorectal cancer death rates were actually higher for whites than African Americans. But, as rates began falling in the 1980’s for both blacks and white patients, decreases for whites were substantially greater than those for blacks.  Between 1985 and 2008, mortality rates for whites with colorectal cancer fell 40 percent, while black rates declined by…  Read More

Screening Rates Go Down for American Indians and Alaska Natives

Colorectal cancer screening rates for colorectal cancer improved between 2000 and 2008 for white, black and Asian-Americans aged 50 and over—but barely improved for Hispanics and actually worsed for American Indians and Alaska Natives. The latest statistics, just reported by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality on March 23, found that: In 2008, among…  Read More

Screening Rates Creep Up . . . But Leave Many Behind

Overall, colorectal cancer screening rates were higher in 2008 than in 2006. By 2008 almost 2 of every 3 Americans over the age of 50 had either had a fecal occult blood test in the past year or sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy within the past ten years. Health insurance made a huge different with two-thirds (66.6 percent)…  Read More

21st Century Challenges to Curing Colorectal Cancer

How many more lives could we save if we simply delivered, consistently, the things that work? That was the challenge that Dr. Arthur Kellerman laid down to people attending the AACR Science of Cancer Health Disparities conference in Miami on September 30. Dr. Kellerman, an emergency room physician, told a sobering story of his patient Diane,…  Read More

Uninsured with Rectal Cancer are More Likely to Die

Insurance makes a difference for people with rectal cancer. Rectal cancer patients without insurance or covered by Medicaid are almost twice as likely to die within five years as those privately insured. Not only are they diagnosed at a later stage, but fewer receive recommended treatments at every stage. More than half of the difference between…  Read More