Tag Archives: Erbitux

First-Line Treatment Approved for Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

There is new first-line treatment (standard of care to start treatment) giving as many as 60% of the stage IV colorectal cancer patients more options for treatment. Previously, most stage IV patients undergoing chemotherapy would be recommended to go on FOLFOX and bevacizumab (Avastin). Patients would receive this first set of drugs (called first-line) and if the cancer continued to grow, then other treatment options would be explored. Recently, the FDA approved an additional drug to be used as a first-line option for some stage IV patients. But this is for a specific set of patients based on their tumor gene type, known as biomarker. The new targeted therapy panitumumab

GRATITUDE FOR YOUR GENEROSITY: Our First Two-Year Research Grant

by Mary Miller Fight Colorectal Cancer is thrilled to announce during this holiday season that thanks to the generous donations made to the Lisa Fund, it will be awarding its first-ever two-year $100,000 grant to a scientist whose work fights advanced stage colorectal cancer. Andrea Bertotti, MD, PhD, of the Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC) in Candiolo, Italy, has learned that his lab will receive this major grant. “His work will be ground-breaking and exactly in line with the reason Lisa Dubow created this fund—to support a promising researcher working to advance the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer,” said Carlea Bauman, president of Fight Colorectal Cancer. Fully 100

Erbitux Approved as First-Line Treatment

The FDA has approved Erbitux™ (cetuximab) in combination with FOLFIRI for first-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose tumors have a wild-type (WT) KRAS gene.  Erbitux was first approved in 2004 for patients whose cancer was not responding to available treatments. FDA’s action was prompted by results from a look back at patient outcomes and KRAS status from three trials: CRYSTAL:  phase 3, 1217 patients newly diagnosed with metastatic CRC, comparing FOLFIRI vs FOLFIRI + Erbitux OPUS: phase 2, 337 patients newly diagnosed with metastatic CRC, comparing FOLFOX vs FOLFOX + Erbitux CA225025: phase 3, 572 patients with metastatic CRC that stopped responding to available treatments, comparing Best Supportive

COIN: No Benefit Found Adding Cetuximab to FOLFOX or CAPOX in First-Line CRC Treatment

Even in colorectal cancer patients with wild-type KRAS mutations, there was no increase in overall survival time or in the time it took before cancer progressed when Erbitux® (cetuximab) was added to FOLFOX or CAPOX chemotherapy. More tumors got smaller with Erbitux treatment, but there was an increase in both serious gastrointestinal toxicity and severe skin rash when the drug was added. Patients with tumor mutations in any of three genes — KRAS, BRAF, or NRAS — had poorer survival.

Personalizing Personalized Medicine

On Monday, April 25th, Fight Colorectal Cancer held a free patient webinar that tackled the somewhat complex but fascinating topic of personalized medicine. Personalized medicine is what the cancer community calls treatments that are tailored to each patient’s genetic makeup. It is the future of cancer care and in some cases, it is already making a big difference in the ways patients are treated. You can learn about these cutting edge treatments and about emerging findings in an archive of the webinar below. Our thanks to Carolyn Grande, CRNP, AOCNP for leading the discussion. She a phenomenal educator on this topic and a member of our Medical Advisory Board. She graciously

Mutations are Not All the Same

We are making significant progress in understanding what genetic alterations in tumors really mean. Over the last two years, we have learned or the first time that there is an alteration in a gene called KRAS in colon cancer, and tumors which have this mutation do not respond to treatment with Erbitux® (cetuximab) or Vectibix® (panitumumab). This is the first time we have a marker to test for sensitivity of an antibody we have to treat colon cancer. It is very important to know that patients with tumors who carry a KRAS mutation (alteration) are not doing worse overall. They just don’t have any benefit from an antibody which targets

Leading GI Cancer Researcher Updates Patients

Last night, Dr. Edith Mitchell of Thomas Jefferson University Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia, PA, updated colorectal cancer patients on the latest research and treatment news in an online webinar. Dr. Mitchell highlighted the most important news for colon and rectal cancer patients to come from the 2011 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium held in San Francisco last month. She answer such questions as… “Can doctors determine the chances that my cancer may return?” “Can my doctors determine if I need chemotherapy?” “Does Avastin or Erbitux benefit my stage III cancer treatment?” “Are there any promising new treatments on the horizon?”

Simple Blood Test May Predict Erbitux Effectiveness

Although we know that KRAS tumor mutations limit benefit from Erbitux, about six out of ten colorectal cancer patients have normal or wild type KRAS. Yet Erbitux doesn’t work for many of them either. There may be a simple way to predict early in treatment whether Erbitux is going to help to not. Significantly more patients whose blood levels of magnesium dropped more than 50 percent after their first treatment with irinotecan and Erbitux had their tumors shrink. It also took longer before their cancer got worse, and they lived longer.

Adding Erbitux to First Line Chemotherapy Helps Advanced Colorectal Cancer Patients with Wild Type KRAS

Does adding Erbitux to chemotherapy help people whose colorectal cancer has spread beyond the colon or rectum to distant body sites? The answer is yes, according to a pooled analysis of two large randomized clinical trials comparing chemotherapy alone to chemotherapy plus Erbitux® (cetuximab).  However, benefits depend on whether or not patient tumors have mutations of two genes, KRAS and BRAF. Previous studies have shown that only patients with normal or wild type KRAS get any benefit from EGFR inhibitors Erbitux or Vectibix™ (panitumumab) so a combined analysis of the CRYSTAL and OPUS studies looked only a outcomes in KRAS wild type tumors.  In addition, the research team studied the

No Benefit Adding Cetuximab to Chemo for Stage III Colon Cancer

Adding Erbitux® (cetuximab) to standard chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer didn’t improve patient outcomes and added more side effects. All of the patients in the NO147 trial had cancer that had spread to their lymph nodes and had surgery before beginning chemotherapy. They had normal or wild-type KRAS genes in their tumors.They were randomly assigned to FOLFOX chemotherapy for 6 months or FOLFOX plus Erbitux.  The trial was closed before the planned number of patients were enrolled because an analysis showed that there was no benefit to the additional Erbitux and continuing the trial would not help patients.

Top