Tag Archives: genetic testing

Genetic Counselor Joins Medical Advisory Board

Long before Angelina Jolie gripped the American public’s attention by announcing her double mastectomy due to a genetic mutation, Fight Colorectal Cancer had been educating patients about family histories, plus supporting and reporting research advances in genetics—especially Lynch syndrome. One of our most reliable sources for patient information and webinars  has been Heather Hampel, MS, CGC, a genetic counselor for 18 years, and Associate Director of the Division of Human Genetics at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center. We’re proud to announce that Heather Hampel is now an official member of our Medical Advisory Board. She first became aware of Fight Colorectal Cancer years ago when the late Kate Murphy, (one

Should All Colorectal Tumors Be Tested for Lynch Syndrome?

An international study described in the Oct. 17 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that universal tumor testing in all newly diagnosed colorectal patients produced a “modest increase” in finding people with Lynch syndrome. One in every 35 people with colorectal cancer has Lynch syndrome – an inherited genetic mutation which greatly increases the person’s chance of developing colorectal cancer more than once, plus other cancers (stomach, pancreas, urinary system, brain or skin cancers). Women with Lynch syndrome also face a 40-60 percent chance of developing endometrial (uterine) cancer in their lifetime and an increased risk for ovarian cancer. Until genetic tests of tumors became available in recent

Widespread Early Screening for Lynch Syndrome is Cost-Effective . . . and Saves Lives

If doctors ask  healthy people simple questions about cancers in their families, they can find people who are at increased risk for Lynch syndrome, an inherited condition that greatly increases risk for colorectal and uterine cancer. Doctors can use a simple set of screening questions available online to pinpoint an individual’s risk before that person ever gets cancer.   The online tool takes less than two minutes to complete. If family history shows an individual to be at higher risk, genetic testing not only saves lives but is cost-effective. Once Lynch syndrome is diagnosed, active steps can be taken to prevent Lynch-associated cancers or diagnose them early when they can be

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