Tag Archives: KRAS

July 2014 Webinar – The Latest News About CRC Research & Treatment

Learn the latest findings from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) conference in May. The latest studies, treatments and developments and how they impact colorectal cancer patients were discussed. PRESENTED BY: Cathy Eng, M.D. Associate Professor, Department of Gastrointestinal (GI) Medical OncologyDr. Cathy Eng is Associate Professor in the Department of Gastrointestinal (GI) Medical Oncology at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Eng received her medical degree from Hahnemann University School of Medicine in Philadelphia, PA, followed by an internship and residency at Rush-Presbyterian St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago, IL. She went on to complete a fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at University of Chicago Medical Center. Dr. Eng is board certified in

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Another treatment option coming down the pike: TAS-102

Fight Colorectal Cancer stays actively involved in the research process from beginning to end. Part of our role in research is monitoring the progress of new drugs – drugs that may be used in treatment plans of colorectal cancer in the future. We actively work with drug companies to stay up-to-date on the latest treatments so that we can let patients and families know what’s happening in the science of colorectal cancer. For the last year, Fight Colorectal Cancer staff have tracked the progress of the drug TAS-102 – an oral chemo drug currently being evaluated in clinical trials for patients with metastatic refractory colorectal cancer. At the ESMO World

First-Line Treatment Approved for Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

There is new first-line treatment (standard of care to start treatment) giving as many as 60% of the stage IV colorectal cancer patients more options for treatment. Previously, most stage IV patients undergoing chemotherapy would be recommended to go on FOLFOX and bevacizumab (Avastin). Patients would receive this first set of drugs (called first-line) and if the cancer continued to grow, then other treatment options would be explored. Recently, the FDA approved an additional drug to be used as a first-line option for some stage IV patients. But this is for a specific set of patients based on their tumor gene type, known as biomarker. The new targeted therapy panitumumab

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Andi’s Highlights on ASCO 2014

by Andi Dwyer, Director of Health Promotion, Fight Colorectal Cancer Working in the cancer prevention and survivorship field for nearly ten years, I was elated to attend my first ASCO.  However, nothing prepared me for the 35,000 people from throughout the world, gathered to unveil the latest in ‘all things’ cancer.  I came in with a notion this was a research conference; I discovered, it was so much more. Policy, advocacy, pharmaceutical, basic research and clinical/medical science from the entire planet, collided into a single city for a solid four days.  It was intense and complete with opportunity and challenge but none-the-less, a guide for this year and beyond. ASCO info about Biomarkers

April 2014 Webinar: Alphabet Soup – Making Sense out of KRAS, BRAF and Tumor Tests

Have you ever heard any of these acronyms, and wondered what they stand for and how they can affect your treatment plan?  This webinar is designed to help patients better understand biomarkers, and how these biomarkers can affect the treatment options patients receive. We’ll discuss the basic understandings of a cancer cell lives, and how it dies.  As researchers are learning more and more about how to treat colorectal cancer, it is bringing the meaning of truly personalized medicine to the forefront. Join us to learn more, and how this research may affect your overall treatment plan. Presented by: Cathy Eng, M.D. Associate Professor, Department of Gastrointestinal (GI) Medical Oncology Dr.

Erbitux Approved as First-Line Treatment

The FDA has approved Erbitux™ (cetuximab) in combination with FOLFIRI for first-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose tumors have a wild-type (WT) KRAS gene.  Erbitux was first approved in 2004 for patients whose cancer was not responding to available treatments. FDA’s action was prompted by results from a look back at patient outcomes and KRAS status from three trials: CRYSTAL:  phase 3, 1217 patients newly diagnosed with metastatic CRC, comparing FOLFIRI vs FOLFIRI + Erbitux OPUS: phase 2, 337 patients newly diagnosed with metastatic CRC, comparing FOLFOX vs FOLFOX + Erbitux CA225025: phase 3, 572 patients with metastatic CRC that stopped responding to available treatments, comparing Best Supportive

Highlights from ASCO 2011

While there weren’t new blockbuster announcements for colorectal cancer this year at the American Society for Clinical Oncology’s (ASCO) Annual Meeting, there was plenty of focus on making what we already have work better and on choosing the patients who will benefit the most from treatments, as well as those who might not be helped at all. (Note, many of these issues will be discussed in detail on our upcoming patient webinar.) Highlights: While adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU improves five year survival slightly for stage II colon cancer, it increases side effects, particularly tingling and numbness in the feet.  An analysis of several NSABP trials found that two or three

Personalizing Personalized Medicine

On Monday, April 25th, Fight Colorectal Cancer held a free patient webinar that tackled the somewhat complex but fascinating topic of personalized medicine. Personalized medicine is what the cancer community calls treatments that are tailored to each patient’s genetic makeup. It is the future of cancer care and in some cases, it is already making a big difference in the ways patients are treated. You can learn about these cutting edge treatments and about emerging findings in an archive of the webinar below. Our thanks to Carolyn Grande, CRNP, AOCNP for leading the discussion. She a phenomenal educator on this topic and a member of our Medical Advisory Board. She graciously

Value of KRAS and BRAF Mutations in Forecasting Survival

For stage II and III colon cancer, a tumor mutation in the KRAS gene does not impact either relapse-free survival or overall survival. BRAF mutations, which are less common, don’t help with prognosis for relapse-free survival, but do provide information about overall survival in some tumors.   Patients with BRAF mutations and microsatellite-low or stable tumors had poorer overall survival than those without mutations.

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