Tag Archives: Lynch syndrome

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Excited Advocates: Recap of Day 1 of 2014 Call-on Congress

Excited Advocates: Recap of Day 1 of 2014 Call-on Congress

It might sound odd to explain the mood of getting over 80 people from all across the country together to talk about colorectal cancer as exciting – but that’s exactly the word that encapsulates the day. At the end of Day 1, there’s a sense among all of us that big things lie ahead over the next 48 hours. And that’s not just because tomorrow some of our team will meet at the White House and speak at a National Press Conference… or that Rep. Donald Payne, Jr. will join us and address our advocates personally. Although those items on tomorrow’s docket are extremely exciting, the overwhelming sense of excitement comes

WE STILL DO – LEANA AND STEVEN

Leana & Steven have lived through “in sickness and in health.” Read their story and why they are doing a “virtual” vow renewal leading up to our One Million Strong kickoff in NYC! FROM LEANA: I met my husband, Steven, when I was in Junior High School. A mutual friend introduced us. Before you knew it we were “going together.” Who would of ever thought that we would get married when I was 18. That was 32 years ago this March. I like to say we have had time to “mold” each other into the person we wanted. Well there was no molding for the life changing diagnosis of colon

WEAR-BLUE-FOR-MOM

Meet the One Million Strong – Natia Porter from New York

Be a part of One Million Strong and tell us how colorectal cancer has impacted your life! Share your story now!  MEET NATIA Natia Porter, Family New York, NY NATIA’S STORY Lynch syndrome or (wrongly called) non-polyposis colorectal cancer runs in genes from my mother’s side. It is wrongly called because it predisposes us up to 8 different types of cancers on a different degree. The first, the almost 99% predisposition is to colon caners, then uterus cancer, renal cancer, ovarian, brain and so on.  In my family, as I later discovered, there has been many colon cancers, many uterus cancers, some renal and one-brain cancer cases. However, I did not

Annual Texas Barbecue Competition Raises Lynch Syndrome Awareness

There’s just one place in Texas where you will find a silent auctioned beer tube, inflatable colon to walk through and some of the best barbecue cooks in the state. So if you’re near the Dallas area, make sure you put the annual Steve Mayberry Memorial Cookoff on your calendar for Sept. 6-7, 2013. Because as they say, everything’s bigger in Texas. And our entire team at Fight Colorectal Cancer is drooling over this yearly fundraiser coming from the Lone Star State. A great reason to BBQ The 2013 Steve Mayberry Memorial Cookoff will mark the 3rd year of awareness and fundraising for colorectal cancer research and education. The competition memorializes Steve

Nov 2012 Webinar: Talking Turkey about Lynch Syndrome

Brian Mansfield, a music critic for USA Today, didn’t know he had Lynch syndrome until he was diagnosed with colorectal cancer earlier this year at the age of 48. After his diagnosis, he began talking with his family about their health history, “then the family tree lit up like a Christmas tree.” Brian is chronicling his journey through a weekly USA Today online column, “My Semicolon Life.” – Were you diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer before the age of 50? – Was anyone in your family diagnosed with colon cancer before the age of 50? – Was anyone in your family diagnosed with uterine (endometrial) cancer before the age

March 22: Lynch Syndrome Hereditary Cancer Public Awareness Day

Fight those Cougars! Colon, ovarian, uterine, gastric, renal, and skin cancer. All Lynch syndrome related cancers, and all significantly increased in families with Lynch syndrome mutations. Brain and small bowel cancer risks are also higher. In addition, new evidence finds that pancreatic and breast cancer are also part of Lynch syndrome. Today, people living with Lynch syndrome come together with researchers, genetic counselors, and healthcare professionals to spread the word that Lynch syndrome can be managed. But first it needs to be recognized. Awareness saves lives. Careful family histories and routine testing after surgery can identify people who have one of the genes that cause Lynch syndrome. When you find

ID-ing Lynch Syndrome in Women with Endometrial Cancer Saves Lives and is Cost-Effective

45,000 women were diagnosed with endometrial cancer in the United States in 2010 — and for nearly 900, cancer was due to Lynch syndrome. Women who have Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of getting endometrial cancer during their lifetime that is as high as 60 percent. Often endometrial cancer (cancer of the lining of the uterus) is the first Lynch-related cancer diagnosed, earlier than colon or rectal cancer. Identifying a mutation in these women can prevent future colorectal cancers and discover ovarian, gastric, and other Lynch cancers early when they can be treated successfully. And not only does this help the woman with endometrial cancer, it helps her family

Screening Tumors for Lynch Syndrome is Cost-Effective

Screening all new colon and rectal cancer tumors for markers that might indicate Lynch syndrome not only saves future lives, it is cost effective according to a new study. In order for tumor screening to be cost-effective, not only should new tumors be tested, but family members need to follow through with genetic testing after a new Lynch mutation is found.  Finally people with Lynch syndrome mutations need to follow surveillance guidelines to prevent cancer or find it early, Testing both tumors and at least three to four family members could cost as little of $36,000 per life year saved — well within the value of preventive health strategies.

Pre-Surgical MSI Testing for Young Patients

Digestive Disease Week 2011 Update Finding colorectal cancer patients with Lynch syndrome helps both patients and their families to prevent cancer. Lynch patients are at high risk for a second or third colon cancer, so identifying them before their colorectal surgery may change the operation planned.  Surgeons may want to remove the entire colon to prevent another colon cancer, and women may choose to have a hysterectomy during the same surgery to prevent endometrial cancer. Because young patients are more likely to have Lynch syndrome, pathologists at the Mayo Clinic tested tumors from patients 50 years old or younger for microsatellite instability (MSI) after their surgery if they had not

Does Colorectal Cancer Run in Your Family?

Miss last week’s webinar?  It’s right here. Listen to Dr. Henry Lynch talk about his early experience with families with unusually high numbers of colorectal and other cancers.  Hear what he has to say about finding families at risk and preventing cancer deaths. Lynch syndrome survivor, Kate Murphy, shares her own story and that of her family.

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