December 2014 Webinar – Nutrition & Bowel Obstructions

Nutrition is an important part of any cancer treatment plan, especially for those individuals who are undergoing colorectal cancer treatment and have had surgery to remove part of the colon. Another important consideration for patients who have had surgery to remove part of the colon is avoiding a bowel obstruction. Knowing which foods you should and…  Read More

November Webinar Follow-up: Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Dr. Lisa Corbin’s presentation on integrative medicine offered real solutions to patients looking to explore complementary treatments as part of their cancer treatment plans. Dr. Corbin shared which treatments are safe and can offer help with managing side effects and symptoms. She also shared about treatments that are harmful and/or aren’t shown to work. See below…  Read More

High Carb Diets Newly Linked With Higher Colorectal Cancer Recurrence

By Curt Pesman Low-carb (and lower sugar) diets may soon look a lot better to colorectal cancer survivors. In a recent data-rich study of more than 1000 stage III colon cancer survivors, researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute found that those who consistently ate a high-carbohydrate, sugar-laden diet appeared to have markedly higher recurrence rates of their…  Read More

Real World Advice on Fighting Colorectal Cancer Recurrence

In last night’s monthly webinar, colorectal cancer patients were given access to a nutritionist who specializes in helping cancer patients. Kimberly Moore Petersen of the Minnie Pearl Cancer Foundation was the presenter for our March 2012 webinar, “Shape Your Plate to Fight Colorectal Cancer.” Extensive research has shown that diet and physical activity can significantly reduce your risk of…  Read More

Keep That Turkey Safe

Even when turkey is well-prepared, bacteria spores may remain that can cause food poisoning if warm turkey is left out too long. Normally, cooking turkey to 165 degrees Fahrenheit will kill bacteria like salmonella or e. coli, as well as Clostridium perfringens, a bacteria common to turkey.  But spores from c. perfringens remain after cooking and…  Read More

No Connections Between Acrylamide and GI Cancers

Acrylamide is produced when carbohydrate-rich foods are cooked at high temperatures.  Foods like french fries, potato chips, cakes, and even coffee contain high levels of acrylamide.  It has been classified as a “probable” carcinogen based on animal studies where cancer resulted from very high doses.  However, human studies have not always produced clear answers. Epidemiologists in…  Read More