Tag Archives: quality of life

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Depression and Cancer: More than a Side Effect?

Depression and Cancer: More than a Side Effect?

This post was written by Curtis Pesmen, survivor and author of My Cancer Year. With the heightened awareness of depression this week, we hope colorectal cancer patients facing depression read this to understand the psycho-social impact of cancer and seek help if needed. On a personal note, our condolences to Curtis and his wife who had a friendship with Robin Williams and his wife. Read Curt’s tribute to him posted in Esquire this week.    For all the advances and new diagnostics in cancer therapy, a stark fact remains: There is no standard CT scan for depression. (At least not yet.) And depression often follows cancer diagnoses. This is but one reason why it remains difficult

Two Advances in Understanding, Treating Painful Chemo Neuropathy

Recent studies show some promise in understanding chemo-caused neuropathy, and perhaps in using a common medicine to ease the worst symptoms in some people. Study shows neuropathy relief for some using antidepressant  A well-designed clinical study has provided the first evidence that the antidepressant Cymbalta® (duloxetine) can provide some patients with significant relief from peripheral neuropathy caused by chemotherapy. From 20 to 40 percent of cancer patients given neurotoxic chemotherapy–taxanes, platinum-based including Eloxatin® (oxaliplatin), vinca alkaloids, bortezomib–will develop painful peripheral neuropathy (numbness, tingling, burning in hands or feet). If the pain is severe, colorectal cancer patients often have to reduce the dose or stop taking Eloxatin. Even then, this painful condition

Cancer-Related Fatigue: Real, Treatable, and Under-Treated

Life-altering fatigue will affect 80% of people getting chemotherapy or radiation therapy, plus most people who have metastatic cancer, and even many survivors long after treatment is done. Yet fatigue in cancer patients has been under-reported, under-diagnosed, and under-treated, according to an expert panel convened by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) a decade ago to recommend cancer-related fatigue treatment guidelines. Some good news: A recent Dutch study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology found that advanced cancer patients can get significant relief from serious fatigue, when their fatigue and other symptoms are regularly monitored and treated according to guidelines. Some less good news: A small U.S. study published

Are Colorectal Cancer Survivors Less Content than Breast Cancer Survivors? If So, Why?

By Curt Pesmen on Nov. 2, 2012  Fight Colorectal Cancer warmly welcomes Curt Pesmen, founding editor of LIVESTRONG Quarterly magazine and author of The Colon Cancer Survivors’ Guide (Tatra Press), who also has written for Esquire, SELF and The New York Times. A long-time admirer of Kate Murphy, he has generously offered to help fill her shoes by sending in Research & Treatment News blogs. At first, it may not make total sense to hear news—released Oct. 30 in an American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) journal—that colorectal cancer survivors tend to have less-positive outlooks and poorer quality of life reports than do breast cancer, melanoma, or other cancer survivors.  But those

Adjuvant Treatment Does Not Have Negative Impact on Elderly Quality of Life

Colon and rectal cancer patients 75 years old and older who are treated with chemotherapy or radiation don’t report any poorer quality of life than older patients who don’t have such therapy.  Patients who had chemotherapy said that their physical functioning was better than that reported by those who didn’t receive chemo.

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