One Million Strong Times Square Kickoff!

What better way to turn on March’s spotlight to colon cancer than an event in NYC’s Times Square! If you own a smart phone, tweet or use Facebook please join Fight Colorectal Cancer for our One Million Strong kickoff on March 1. Live in NYC? Even better. Click here if you live or work near NYC.…  Read More

Participants Needed for Rectal Cancer Surgery Trial

Approximately 80 more participants are needed for a multisite, Phase 3 clinical trial comparing laparoscopic-assisted versus conventional surgery in patients with stage IIA, Stage IIIA or stage IIIB rectal cancer.  Eligible participants must have completed their pre-surgery chemotherapy (Xelox™ or fluorouracil-based) and/or pre-surgery radiation therapy within the previous 4 weeks.

Veterans Health System Beats Medicare in Colon Cancer Survival

Older men with several kinds of cancer–including colon cancer–do as well or better in the Veterans’ Health Administration as men covered by Medicare, according to a new study published by the Journal of Clinical Oncology in an advanced online release. The Veterans’ Administration is the nation’s largest integrated health system, providing care for 6 million veterans…  Read More

Rising Incidence of Colorectal Cancer in Under Fifties

Contrary to what is happening for people over fifty, rates of colon and rectal cancer are rising in younger adults. While new colorectal cancers in older people have fallen consistently since 1985, rates for people under 50 have risen, particularly for rectal cancer. Even more concerning, young people with colon cancer were diagnosed at later, less…  Read More

More Rectal Cancer in Young People

Rectal cancer rates are increasing in people under 40, although rates of colon cancer have remained stable in younger people. It isn’t clear why, but rectal cancer rates in this young group of men and women began increasing in 1984, rising about 3.8 percent a year. Increases were similar for both sexes and all races.

Uninsured with Rectal Cancer are More Likely to Die

Insurance makes a difference for people with rectal cancer. Rectal cancer patients without insurance or covered by Medicaid are almost twice as likely to die within five years as those privately insured. Not only are they diagnosed at a later stage, but fewer receive recommended treatments at every stage. More than half of the difference between…  Read More