Tag Archives: Research

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2014 Award Winners

2014 Award Winners

Each March at Call-on Congress, Fight Colorectal Cancer recognizes individuals who exemplify what our organization is all about. These people are not only advocates – they’re champions. Each of them offers their experience and passion to further the cause. This year’s 2014 Award Winners set the bar high. Advocate of the Year – Gordon Cole A survivor of stage IV colorectal cancer since 2003, Gordon Cole is an inspiration. As a hands-on patient, he’s actively monitored his own treatment (which consists of multiple surgeries, radiation, chemotherapy and several clinical trials.) As an advocate, he’s pushed for better policy and research funding. His constant voice has helped us raise colorectal cancer

Comments on New DNA & Stool-Based Screening Tests to FDA

This week Fight Colorectal Cancer is providing comments to the FDA as they consider two new screening technologies for colorectal cancer. Below are our opinions and recommendations presented to the Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel as part of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. Background: This week, the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) is hosting an advisory committee meeting with many stakeholders that have an interest in two new potential screening technologies, Epi proColon (by Epigenomics) and Cologuard (by Exact Sciences). Kim Ryan, our Director of Patient Information Services and advocate Marcia Mullins are attending to provide comments as the FDA considers these two new screening technologies.   About Epi proColon & Cologuard

Why Do Drugs Cost So Much?

by Chris Adams A response to A Tale of Two Drugs, an article by Barry Werth published in the MIT Technology Review Oct. 2013 Drug prices. Why are they so high? In a recent article for the MIT Technology Review, Barry Werth considers the pricing of two recently developed and very expensive drugs. The first drug is used for cystic fibrosis and costs almost $25,000 per month. The second drug is used for metastatic colon cancer and is priced at $11,000 per month. So why are these drugs so expensive? Why do companies charge so much for their drugs? The simple answer is that they can and so they do.

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Preview: 5 Advocates To Attend 2014 GI Cancer Symposium

Next week, five research advocates from Fight Colorectal Cancer will attend the 2014 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium in San Francisco, CA. This annual conference presents the latest science in treating all GI cancers, including colorectal cancer. According to the Symposium, it “offers a fresh perspective on gastrointestinal cancers, with a special focus on the most pertinent information oncologists of all subspecialties need to know now in order to provide the highest quality of care.” It’s expected that researchers, physicians, scientists and others who work in the GI cancer field will attend. But thanks to survivors willing to use their voices and our research advocacy program – patients will also have a

You don’t have to be a scientist to get involved in research

Remember the feeling of being a young freshman student walking the halls lined with senior lockers? Sweaty palms. Knocking knees. It was intimidating to be surrounded by upper classman. As a cancer survivor, sometimes the research process can feel similar to the “good” ole’ days of high school. Especially if you don’t love chemistry. But as Florence, a survivor and advocate can attest, if you give it a little time — research can be for ANYONE. Although it may not come easy for you at first, when you slow down and take small steps, you too will begin to see that research isn’t always as complex or difficult as it

Stage II and Stage III Post-Treatment Survivors Needed! No Medicine! Not a Clinical Trial!

Did you have stage II or stage III colon cancer after June 2003?  Is your treatment complete? Do you want to help test research documents? Do you want to earn an easy $40 for your time? Fight Colorectal Cancer is helping the National Cancer Institute (NCI) find patients to test their new Informed Consent Document (ICD).  ICDs are supposed to explain a research study to patients; however, in the last 20 years, ICDs have turned into long, legal documents that make it difficult for patients to understand. A couple years ago, NCI revised the ICD form with the help of researchers and patients. Now, it’s time to test it out!

Experts Issue Practice-Changing Advice: Stop giving calcium/magnesium for oxaliplatin-caused neuropathy

For patients getting the common FOLFOX chemotherapy for colorectal cancer, many oncologists add intravenous calcium and magnesium, hoping to decrease the neuropathy (nerve damage) associated with oxaliplatin-based drugs. But this week, experts at the 2013 ASCO meeting (American Society of Clinical Oncology), announced strong evidence that the calcium/magnesium does no good in either preventing or decreasing neuropathy—and it should no longer be part of routine treatment. Neuropathy affects cancer treatment Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy (e.g. FOLFOX, with Eloxatin®) is one of the most commonly used drugs for people having high-risk stage II, or stages III or IV colorectal cancer. But far too often after patients have had many doses of FOLFOX over

Two Advances in Understanding, Treating Painful Chemo Neuropathy

Recent studies show some promise in understanding chemo-caused neuropathy, and perhaps in using a common medicine to ease the worst symptoms in some people. Study shows neuropathy relief for some using antidepressant  A well-designed clinical study has provided the first evidence that the antidepressant Cymbalta® (duloxetine) can provide some patients with significant relief from peripheral neuropathy caused by chemotherapy. From 20 to 40 percent of cancer patients given neurotoxic chemotherapy–taxanes, platinum-based including Eloxatin® (oxaliplatin), vinca alkaloids, bortezomib–will develop painful peripheral neuropathy (numbness, tingling, burning in hands or feet). If the pain is severe, colorectal cancer patients often have to reduce the dose or stop taking Eloxatin. Even then, this painful condition

Research and Advocacy

Those who go into medical research often have science on the mind. Not politics. But researchers who joined us for the 2013 Call-on Congress showed how the two fields merge. Particularly when funding is involved. Fighting Colorectal Cancer at the Research and Policy Levels I love how Nancy Roach, Founder and Chair of the Board, explains the importance of advocacy AND research in the One Million Strong PSA, “I founded Fight Colorectal Cancer in 2006 because people who have been touched by colorectal cancer need a voice at the tables where decisions are being made that impact their survival.” – Nancy Roach Fighting colorectal cancer demands more than raising awareness

Tuesday Recap | 2013 Call-on Congress

I’ve never served in the military but I can only imagine what soldiers go through the night before they leave for deployment or battle. Years of training and preparation lead up to the big day. It’s the military-version of starring on Broadway. It must feel similar to tonight – the hours before we hit the Hill during the Call-on Congress. The fight against colorectal cancer feels like war sometimes. Battle after battle (or doctor’s visits, scans, surgeries and procedures) create a war on many fronts… whether you’re the patient in the hospital bed or the loved one holding their hand. But after a day like today’s Call-on Congress, those of

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