Colonoscopies Not Perfect in Stopping Colorectal Cancer Deaths

The percentage of colorectal cancer deaths prevented by colonoscopy may be overestimated. While still very effective in preventing colorectal cancer and deaths from the disease, limits of the test may be larger than previously thought.  Patients need to know that having colonoscopy does not guarantee that they won’t get colorectal cancer. Experts now say that screening…  Read More

Negative Media Messages Discourage CRC Screening in Blacks

When African Americans hear a positive message that emphasizes progress being made for blacks with colon cancer, they are much more likely to want to be screened.  On the other hand, negative messages that talk about their poorer outcomes make them less willing to have screening tests. Health communications researchers at St. Louis University asked 300…  Read More

Less Than a Third of Medicaid Patients Are Screened for Colorectal Cancer

When researchers reviewed medical records for Medicaid-insured people over 50, they found that only about half had colorectal cancer screening recommended to them by their doctors.  But only 28 percent actually received screening. Having an on-going relationship with a doctor (medical home) made a difference.  People who had been seeing their primary care doctor for more…  Read More

Metabolic Syndrome Increases Colorectal Cancer Risk

People with a combination of three common medical conditions together known as metabolic syndrome have a greatly increased risk of colorectal cancer.  The three are hypertension, diabetes and elevated cholesterol. Reviewing answers the the National Health Interview Survey, researchers found that people who reported metabolic syndrome conditions were almost twice as likely to have colorectal cancer. …  Read More

USPSTF Updates Screening Guidelines

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has updated their colorectal cancer screening recommendations. Changes from the 2002 guidelines include recommendations not to routinely screen people over 75 and not to screen people over 85 at all. Decisions about screening between 76 and 85 need to be made in light of individual health, prior screening,…  Read More

Colorectal Cancer Screening Before 65 Could Save Medicare Dollars

Screening people for colorectal cancer before they reach 65 and are eligible for Medicare could save millions of dollars of future Medicare costs according to a New York City study. While Medicare covers the cost of screening colonoscopies, people need to be 65 to benefit.  Many uninsured adults from 50 to 64 have no way to…  Read More