Tag Archives: stage III colon cancer

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Meet the One Million Strong: Jo-Ann C. from Ontario,Canada

Meet the One Million Strong: Jo-Ann C. from Ontario,Canada

Be a part of One Million Strong and tell us how colorectal cancer has impacted your life! Share your story now!  MEET JO-ANN Jo-Ann Cluney, Survivor Pickering, Ontario, Canada JO-ANN’S STORY I was diagnosed with Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer in November of 2011.  I had a colon resection within two weeks of diagnoses and started chemo and radiation in January of 2012.  Not knowing anyone who had been through this, I was very scared of the unknown.  Thank goodness for sites like this to learn from others who have been there.  My chemo finished in July of 2012 and I have been in remission ever since.  I want people to know

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Meet the One Million Strong – Marcia M from West Virginia

Be a part of One Million Strong and tell us how colorectal cancer has impacted your life! Share your story now!  MEET MARCIA Marcia Mullins, Survivor Huntington, WV MARCIA’S STORY Despite Katie Couric’s warning, when I turned 50 I declined to have a colonoscopy, I didn’t think I was at risk. When I had symptoms at 57, I used hemorrhoid cream and tried to ignore them. Right after my 58th birthday, I had a rectal hemorrhage and was admitted to the hospital for a colonoscopy the next morning. It was not hemorrhoids. It was stage IIIc rectal cancer. After lots of chemo, radiation and surgery, I am now in remission. I could have avoided it

New Trial Looks to Reduce Recurrence and Neuropathy for Stage III Patients

If you are diagnosed with stage III colon cancer, you will probably receive about six months of treatment with FOLFOX after surgery. Research shows that this treatment regimen helps prevent recurrence for some – but not all – patients with stage III colon cancer.  A clinical trial has been launched to answer two questions about this current standard of care: 1. Will recurrence rates go down if both FOLFOX and celecoxib (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug similar to aspirin) are used for treatment? 2.  Will recurrence rates stay the same and long term side effects decrease if FOLFOX is used for three months?

Chemo Delay After Surgery Reduces Survival Rates

A paper presented at the recent 2011 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium conference reported important evidence that, for colorectal cancer patients getting chemotherapy after surgery, the sooner the better. For people diagnosed with stage III colon cancer, stage II rectal cancer, or stage II colon cancer showing certain high-risk features, researchers found that each four-week delay in starting chemotherapy after surgery was associated with a 12% lower rate of survival five years later.

Leading GI Cancer Researcher Updates Patients

Last night, Dr. Edith Mitchell of Thomas Jefferson University Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia, PA, updated colorectal cancer patients on the latest research and treatment news in an online webinar. Dr. Mitchell highlighted the most important news for colon and rectal cancer patients to come from the 2011 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium held in San Francisco last month. She answer such questions as… “Can doctors determine the chances that my cancer may return?” “Can my doctors determine if I need chemotherapy?” “Does Avastin or Erbitux benefit my stage III cancer treatment?” “Are there any promising new treatments on the horizon?”

No Benefit Adding Cetuximab to Chemo for Stage III Colon Cancer

Adding Erbitux® (cetuximab) to standard chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer didn’t improve patient outcomes and added more side effects. All of the patients in the NO147 trial had cancer that had spread to their lymph nodes and had surgery before beginning chemotherapy. They had normal or wild-type KRAS genes in their tumors.They were randomly assigned to FOLFOX chemotherapy for 6 months or FOLFOX plus Erbitux.  The trial was closed before the planned number of patients were enrolled because an analysis showed that there was no benefit to the additional Erbitux and continuing the trial would not help patients.

No Difference in Chemotherapy Benefits for Young Patients with Stage II and III Colon Cancer Compared to Those Fifty and Older

Young patients with stage II or III colon cancer get equal benefit from chemotherapy as older patients, and they have similar side effects. Five years after treatment, 67 percent of patients under the age of fifty hadn’t had their cancer spread beyond the colon (recurrence-free interval), the same percentage that applied to patients who were fifty or over. Overall survival and disease-free survival were somewhat better for young patients because they had fewer other reasons for dying.  Overall and disease-free survival reflect patients who are alive five years after beginning treatment.  Neither includes people who have died from any cause, including their cancer.

KRAS Made No Difference in Stage III Outcome

Patients with stage III colon cancer didn’t do better or worse if their tumor had mutated KRAS. Studying KRAS in the tumors of about half the patients in a large clinical trial of chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer, researchers found no differences in disease-free, recurrence-free, or overall survival.  This remained true no matter which chemotherapy the patients received.

ASCO Research Highlights: Molecular Markers in Stage II and III Colon Cancer

Several studies presented at ASCO looked a biomarkers that might predict cancer recurrence or patient survival in stage II and III colon cancer and whether patients could be chosen to receive chemotherapy based on those markers.  Of special interest was the hypothesis offered by two researchers from the PETACC-3 clinical trial that stage II and stage III may be very different biologically.  As Dr. Arnaud Roth said, “. . .in other words, could be different diseases.”

Adding Irinotecan to Infusional 5-FU Does Not Add Benefit for Stage III Colon Cancer

Five years after surgery, there was no improvement in either disease-free survival or overall survival when irinotecan was added to standard 5-FU treatments delivered via continous infusion for patients with stage III colon cancer.  Adding irinotecan increased the rate of serious side effects. The PETACC-3  (Pan European Trial Adjuvant Colon Cancer)  trial was designed to see if adding irinotecan to 5-FU and leucovorin could increase the percentage of stage III patients who were alive and cancer-free (disease-free survival).  It also studied overall survival and relapse-free survival.

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