Tag Archives: survivorship

Tuesday Recap | 2013 Call-on Congress

I’ve never served in the military but I can only imagine what soldiers go through the night before they leave for deployment or battle. Years of training and preparation lead up to the big day. It’s the military-version of starring on Broadway. It must feel similar to tonight – the hours before we hit the Hill during the Call-on Congress. The fight against colorectal cancer feels like war sometimes. Battle after battle (or doctor’s visits, scans, surgeries and procedures) create a war on many fronts… whether you’re the patient in the hospital bed or the loved one holding their hand. But after a day like today’s Call-on Congress, those of

National Cancer Survivor’s Day — June 3

What a way to celebrate National Colorectal Cancer Survivor’s Day – a huge meeting of researchers, cancer research advocates, healthcare professionals who take care of people with cancer at the Annual Meeting of the Association of Clinical Oncology in Chicago. Over 12 million people in the US have been diagnosed with cancer and are alive, over 1 million with colon or rectal cancer.

National Cancer Survivor's Day — June 3

What a way to celebrate National Colorectal Cancer Survivor’s Day – a huge meeting of researchers, cancer research advocates, healthcare professionals who take care of people with cancer at the Annual Meeting of the Association of Clinical Oncology in Chicago. Over 12 million people in the US have been diagnosed with cancer and are alive, over 1 million with colon or rectal cancer.

Giving Thanks for Colorectal Cancer Survivors

Today there are more than 1 million survivors of colon and rectal cancer in the United States, probably 600,000 to 700,000 with no sign of cancer. And we are grateful for their courage and persistence and for all the people that have made more cures and longer survival possible. The National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship defines  someone as a cancer survivor from the time of diagnosis and for the balance of life.

Over a Million Colorectal Cancer Survivors in the US

Among the nearly 12 million US cancer survivors, there are 1.1 million who have been diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer. The number of all US cancer survivors has increased steadily from about 3.8 million in 1971 to 9.8 million in 2001 to 11.7 million in 2007. More than half of survivors had colorectal, breast, or prostate cancer. Individuals are considered cancer survivors from the time of diagnosis through the balance of their lives.

Half of Colorectal Cancer Survivors Not Getting Recommended Colonoscopies

Despite guidelines calling for a colonoscopy a year after surgery for colon or rectal cancer, less than half of patients have had one 14 months after colorectal surgery intended to cure their cancer. A study of stage I, II, and III colorectal cancer patients in the United States found that only 49 percent had received the recommended colonoscopy. Currently follow-up guidelines call for a surveillance colonoscopy to look for local cancer recurrence or new polyps or cancers a year after surgery.  If that exam is normal, another colonoscopy is called for three years later and then every five years. 

Working Women with Cancer Can Be Beautiful

Are you a woman with cancer who wants to work but you worry that your resume needs to be tuned up or your makeup fine-tuned? Spend an evening with Cancer and Careers starting at 6 pm on July 14th at the W Hotel in Washington and get Resume makeovers, interview tips and career coaching from Cancer and Careers Self-instruction on facial massage and makeup application techniques with Shiseido beauty experts Relaxation and wellness tips from SELF Magazine

Wanted: Colorectal Cancer Survivors Finished with Treatment

If you have completed your colorectal cancer treatment within the past two years, researchers at the University of Texas need your help. Led by Nynikka Palmer, a doctoral student at the University of Texas School of Public Health, a study will explore the goals and plans colorectal cancer survivors have for their health after their treatment is over. Learn more about the survey or sign up.

Today is National Start Walking Day

Put on those sneakers and take a walk! Today is National Start Walking Day.  Not only can regular walking reduce risk for heart disease, it can be part of an exercise program to prevent colorectal cancer and support survivorship. Thirty minutes of walking at a moderate pace has been shown to reduce risk of getting colorectal cancer.  Plus exercise after surgery for stage III colon cancer reduced the chances of its coming back.

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