Tag Archives: tumor

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Meet the One Million Strong – Sarah H. from Ontario

Meet the One Million Strong – Sarah H. from Ontario

MEET SARAH Sarah Howe, survivor St. Catharines, Ontario SARAH’S STORY On March 28, 2014 I began experiencing intense stomach pain that I brushed off as “normal” because I had just given birth to my third child two days prior.When the pain persisted, and was still occurring after two weeks, I decided to go to the ER. The doctor said it “might be a kidney infection,” and gave me a prescription for antibiotics. The next day I went back and another doctor said, “You probably just tore muscles from labor.” I fought with the pain for four more weeks before going back to the ER, where a doctor refused to even look

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Meet the One Million Strong – Ed M. from Ohio

Be a part of One Million Strong and tell us how colorectal cancer has impacted your life! Share your story now!  MEET ED Ed Murphy, CaregiverMilford, Ohio ED’S STORY My wife, Arlene, was diagnosed with colon cancer in September, 2004 while trying to find the source of her recently diagnosed anemia. During the surgery to remove the tumor and resect the colon, lymph nodes were checked and it was determined to be stage III colon cancer. Arlene started chemo in early November and by late December there had been a metastasis to her ovaries. After ovarian surgery we were now looking at stage IV colon cancer.  We decided to go for

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Meet the One Million Strong – Robert D from Red Lake, Minnesota

Be a part of One Million Strong and tell us how colorectal cancer has impacted your life! Share your story now!  MEET ROBERT Robert DesJarlait, Survivor Red Lake, MN ROBERT’S STORY In April 2013,   I had an endoscopy showing a gastric ulcer that was repaired. At the suggestion of my doctor, I had a follow-up colonoscopy which revealed a large cecal mass. The adenoma (benign tumor) measured 10 cm; however, within the adenoma, there was a 2.5 cm adenocarcinoma (cancerous tumor). It was rated as a T-2 tumor, Stage I cancer. Approximately one-foot of my colon was removed during resection.My oncologist said I was very fortunate to have the colonoscopy when

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Meet the One Million Strong – Linda Kroll from Illinois

Be a part of One Million Strong and tell us how colorectal cancer has impacted your life! Share your story now!  MEET LINDA Linda Kroll, Survivor Chicago, Illinois LINDA’S STORY My ulcerative colitis had been in remission for years, and I was lulled into a false sense of security. When my (belated) routine colonoscopy found an aggressive tumor in my cecum, 12 inches of my ascending colon were removed two weeks ago, along with all of the cancer. I am blessed and grateful beyond words. I want to pay forward my second chance on life and encourage everyone to book your colonoscopy TODAY!It’s a painless exam that will save your life!

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WE STILL DO – KIM & JEFFREY

KIM: There was blood… One hour before the mayor of Philadelphia’s Inauguration Celebration, I see it. During my quick bathroom break I spot blood in the toilet. I hoped it was a warning sign of my monthly cycle to come.  It was not. I’m not sure how I knew something was wrong but I did. My name was being called over the walkie talkie from someone on the production team as if the world was on fire (everything in event planning is a fire to some people.) “Go for KIM!” I responded as if to say, “I’m HERE…funny.” After putting out the event-fire I called Jeffrey, my husband, and said “I just

Should All Colorectal Tumors Be Tested for Lynch Syndrome?

An international study described in the Oct. 17 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that universal tumor testing in all newly diagnosed colorectal patients produced a “modest increase” in finding people with Lynch syndrome. One in every 35 people with colorectal cancer has Lynch syndrome – an inherited genetic mutation which greatly increases the person’s chance of developing colorectal cancer more than once, plus other cancers (stomach, pancreas, urinary system, brain or skin cancers). Women with Lynch syndrome also face a 40-60 percent chance of developing endometrial (uterine) cancer in their lifetime and an increased risk for ovarian cancer. Until genetic tests of tumors became available in recent

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