Tag Archives: Appropriations

Cuts have consequences

You may start hearing the word “sequestration” a lot over the coming months. It’s a big word that might not mean a whole lot to you now, but make no mistake – it could have a big impact on your life. To sequester means to set apart or to take something away until a debt has been repaid. Last year, when Congress passed the Budget Control Act, it said that funding for discretionary programs – those are programs that Congress funds each year through the appropriations process – must be cut by $1 trillion over 10 years. It also directed a joint Congressional committee to identify an additional $1.2 trillion

You Did It! Colorectal Cancer Funding Spared the Budget Ax

This weekend, Congress completed work on a large spending bill that maintains funding for colorectal cancer research and prevention. In the current budget-cutting environment, holding the line on research and prevention programs is a remarkable accomplishment and reflects the power of grassroots advocacy. I congratulate the Fight Colorectal Cancer volunteers who took action this year to protect colorectal cancer research and prevention funding. We should be proud of our achievements, but we cannot become complacent. We must prepare for the Fiscal Year 2013 budget battle that lies ahead. Please register to attend Fight Colorectal Cancer’s Call-on Congress next March – where advocates from around the country will be urging their legislators

Cancer funding decision delayed. Time to take action, advocates!

Earlier this month, the House Labor, Health and Human Services (HHS), and Education Appropriations Subcommittee announced that it has postponed consideration of its fiscal year (FY) 2012 spending bill until September. Delayed consideration of this bill, which funds the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), gives colorectal cancer advocates more time to contact their House and Senate lawmakers when they return home in August. The message: Funding for colorectal cancer research and prevention must be a priority.

House Approves Colorectal Cancer Research Funding for Fiscal Year 2012

This afternoon, by a vote of 336-87, the House passed the Fiscal Year 2012 Department of Defense Appropriations bill (H.R. 2219). The bill includes funding for critical national security needs while also providing essential funding for health and quality of life programs for the men and women of the Armed Services and their families. The final bill includes more than $223 million for cancer research, including $12.8 million for the Department of Defense’s Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP) that funds colorectal cancer research.

Full House to Vote on Colorectal Cancer Research Funding Next Week

This week the House Appropriations Committee approved $223 million for cancer research, including $12.8 million for the Department of Defense’s Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP) that funds colorectal cancer research. Next week, the full House will consider the bill. During consideration of the bill by the full House, there may be amendments offered to eliminate or reduce this important funding. Keep reading for more information on why the PRCRP funding is important and what you can do to help ensure the funding stays in the fiscal year 2012 defense appropriations bill.

Join the Fight Against Colorectal Cancer as a Virtual Lobbyist

On Wednesday March 9, advocates from all across the country are heading to the hill to talk to Congress as part of Fight Colorectal Cancer’s annual Call-on Congress lobby day. You can join them in the fight from your home or office. We’ve put together everything you need to be a virtual lobbyist. The Virtual Lobby Day is an opportunity for patients, survivors, caregivers, health care providers, and researchers across the country to join together with one voice to tell Congress that you believe that the time has come for Congress to make colorectal cancer a top legislative priority! Between your phone calls and the in-person visits from advocates who

Top