Fight CRC News articles

Cancer Experts Gather at Chicago ASCO

With more than 30,000 members worldwide, ASCO (the American Society for Clinical Oncology) is the world’s largest organization of cancer specialists. Today in Chicago, hundreds are gathering for the annual ASCO meeting where scientific researchers present their latest findings, and clinical specialists (oncologists, surgeons, radiologists, nurses) begin to hear how the new science can be applied to their patients. Fight Colorectal Cancer is represented at ASCO by staff, Board members, and four of its Medical Advisory Board who will be presenting their own research and papers. (Watch here for reports.) “The average oncologist really needs to understand more molecular biology now than ever before,” noted Scientific Program Committee Chairman Dr. Douglas

Genetic Counselor Joins Medical Advisory Board

Long before Angelina Jolie gripped the American public’s attention by announcing her double mastectomy due to a genetic mutation, Fight Colorectal Cancer had been educating patients about family histories, plus supporting and reporting research advances in genetics—especially Lynch syndrome. One of our most reliable sources for patient information and webinars  has been Heather Hampel, MS, CGC, a genetic counselor for 18 years, and Associate Director of the Division of Human Genetics at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center. We’re proud to announce that Heather Hampel is now an official member of our Medical Advisory Board. She first became aware of Fight Colorectal Cancer years ago when the late Kate Murphy, (one

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“You Don’t Own Me….” But do you own part of my genes?

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Monday in a case that both sides consider absolutely vital to the future of medical research. The case: Can a company take out a patent on a human gene? Or, as the company Myriad Genetics told the Court, not actually a patent on a gene, but a patent on isolated sections of DNA molecules that they synthetically re-create in the lab to make a test for the gene. Patents were created 150 years ago in the Constitution as temporary protection of new inventions, thus giving economic incentive for inventors. But there is a clear rule that you cannot patent “a product of nature.” During oral

Fight Colorectal Cancer Awards Late Stage Disease Research Grant

Fight Colorectal Cancer and its generous Lisa Fund donors struck a blow against late stage colorectal cancer Tuesday, April 9th at the 2013 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in Washington D.C. Top cancer researchers from around the nation applauded as we, along with the AACR, awarded a $50,000 research grant to Pia Morelli, M.D., Ph.D., a post-doctoral Fellow at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. With this grant, Dr. Morelli will use highly specific DNA tests on blood samples to identify those patients most likely to respond to drugs that target the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR), and also to detect

Cancer Survivors: Population Explosion Coming

  You think we’ve made a lot of noise during this Colorectal Cancer Awareness month? We’re only going to get louder. On Monday morning, Fight Colorectal Cancer survivors and advocates will ring the opening bell on NASDAQ—representing 1.2 million colorectal cancer survivors in the U.S. who are only going to get louder as our numbers grow. Good news or bad news? Both, really. As Boomers age, more Americans will get cancer—and with better treatment and earlier diagnosis, there will be more cancer survivors. In just 10 years, the number of cancer survivors in the U.S. will increase by nearly a third—to almost 18 million survivors of all types of cancer

Avastin Recall for Eye Treatments

The FDA announced yesterday that due to five cases of eye infections reported at one Georgia medical practice, a “compounding pharmacy” in Georgia has voluntarily recalled 79 lots of  Avastin (bevacizumab) repackaged into small vials  intended for retinal (eye) injections. Ophthalmologists sometimes use bevacizumab as an off-label treatment (not approved by the FDA) for “wet” macular degeneration. No Avastin preparations for oncology practices were involved in the recall. Clinical Specialties, the Georgia compounding pharmacy, said it distributes the bevacizumab-filled syringes to about a dozen physicians in Georgia, Louisiana, South Caroline and Indiana. Just two days ago, the FDA announced that the New Jersey compounding pharmacy Med Prep Consulting was recalling all of

Important information to know – from screening to diagnosis for colorectal cancer

Tips From a Member of Our Medical Advisory Board Al B. Benson III, MD, FACP FASCO is Professor of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine,  and Associate Director for Clinical Investigations, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University One of the nation’s most respected experts in colorectal cancer, Dr. Benson has supported and worked with Fight Colorectal Cancer for years as an active member of our Medical Advisory Board.   Written by Dr. Al Benson, March 18 2013, Chicago, Illinois Although March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, this disease is so frequent yet in most cases preventable that we should be striving every month of the year to make even more people

Too Many Colonoscopies in Over-75s?

A study published in the March 11 JAMA-Internal Medicine suggests that 23 percent of over-75-year-olds have colonoscopies that may be “potentially inappropriate” according to national guidelines which include an upper age limit, as well as how often negative colonoscopies should be repeated. In a retrospective population study, University of Texas researchers looked at billings for 100 percent of colonoscopies performed in Medicare beneficiaries in Texas who were aged 70 years and older who had a colonoscopy in 2008 or 2009. They also examined a nationwide sample of 5% of Medicare claims. Colonscopies were classified as “screening” if records (including claims from 2000 to 2009) did not indicate a diagnosis, or

Partial Fix for Unexpected Colonoscopy Charges

Some people who go in for a routine screening colonoscopy (fully covered by most insurance) can end up with a surprise bill of several hundred dollars, if the doctor detected and removed one or more polyps. Under current law, Medicare beneficiaries must pay a coinsurance when their screening colonoscopy also involves the removal of polyps or other tissue—because it is reclassified as a “treatment” procedure. Additionally, while current law also requires most private payers to cover colorectal cancer screenings without cost-sharing (copays/ coinsurance/ deductible), private payers have interpreted the rules differently. Some private payers waive cost- sharing when a screening involves the removal of polyps or other tissue; others do not.

FEATURED ADVOCATE: Tom Foeller

Tom Foeller – Portland, Oregon by Carlene Canton Tom Foeller joined the Grassroots Action Committee* this year but he is certainly no stranger to Fight Colorectal Cancer or to cancer itself. Diagnosed with stage III rectal cancer in 2006, Tom fought long and hard for the strength and health he enjoys – and puts to good use – today. Now as a four-time participant in Call-on Congress, a former regional director for Fight Colorectal Cancer and an active member of the Fight Colorectal Cancer Oregon contingent, thoughts of how to reach and help colorectal cancer patients and how to motivate congressional change are never far from Tom’s daily thoughts. After

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