Tag Archives: cancer

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Depression and Cancer: More than a Side Effect?

Depression and Cancer: More than a Side Effect?

This post was written by Curtis Pesmen, survivor and author of My Cancer Year. With the heightened awareness of depression this week, we hope colorectal cancer patients facing depression read this to understand the psycho-social impact of cancer and seek help if needed. On a personal note, our condolences to Curtis and his wife who had a friendship with Robin Williams and his wife. Read Curt’s tribute to him posted in Esquire this week.    For all the advances and new diagnostics in cancer therapy, a stark fact remains: There is no standard CT scan for depression. (At least not yet.) And depression often follows cancer diagnoses. This is but one reason why it remains difficult

One Voice Against Cancer: Maria’s Perspective

by Maria Williams, advocate I look over my list of meetings on my schedule for the day with OVAC, One Voice Against Cancer, while listening to our morning “pep” talk.  My meetings are set at just the right intervals, no running back and forth between the house and senate sides of the Hill. The names on the schedule are ones I recognize from meetings over that past couple of years, this brings me a sense of comfort and relief, hoping these folks will remember me. I know I will be meeting with legislative staff from previous trips. I’m feeling more confident than I have in the past, this being my

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Cancer – Don’t Think Too Hard About It

by Danielle Burgess, two-time colorectal cancer survivor and Fight CRC’s Communications Director I recently received surprising advice from a counselor. I explained that losing friends to colorectal cancer doesn’t only sadden me – it scares me. Especially as someone with Lynch Syndrome. I can go from mourning the sudden loss of a friend, to feeling a strange pain in my side, to worrying that the pain was more than just gas, to assuming that if it hasn’t already – the cancer will come back, to sorting out how I’m going to tell my family that I’ve been diagnosed again… all in about two minutes. I think this is pretty common among

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Survivorship Researcher’s Response to WSJ Article on Cancer Care

by Andrea (Andi) Dwyer, The Colorado School of Public Health and University of Colorado Cancer Center Response to the Wall Street Journal article:  The Next Front in Cancer Care Cancer survivorship topics are featured in the Wall Street Journal? How exciting! As noted in the article by the WSJ, Treatment Summaries and Survivorship Care Plans (TS/SCP) are now encouraged and required by The Commission on Cancer.  Several foundations and survivorship champions have begun to offer templates and structure to help clinical teams and treatment facilities provide the specific information. The hope is that they help patients bridge primary care with understanding of their treatment and health recommendations going forward. The large scale

Screening for Prevention vs. Early Detection | Response to JAMA Article

The July 29, 2013 edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) includes an opinion piece titled, “Over diagnoses and treatment of cancer? An opportunity for improvement.”  The authors highlight the growing body of literature and a growing depth of understanding as it relates to cancer prevention and early detection. They call for an open dialogue between patients and the medical community. Fight Colorectal Cancer couldn’t resist weighing in on this issue. Colorectal cancer is a “Crown Jewel” of cancer screening The article (which can be read in full here) discusses what we’ve learned from data about cancer incidence (number of diagnoses) and cancer mortality (number of deaths). 

The “Now What” After Cancer Treatment

It’s an amazing day. You stand up and get dressed, finally getting to wear clothes that don’t have a huge crack in the back. Or, you walk away from the leather chair in the chemo ward for the last time. Becoming “free” of cancer is a day all survivors long for – it’s the goal. The finish line in sight. But for many of us, once we “cross the finish line,” we aren’t necessarily jumping up and down at the victory like we thought we would. Instead, something unexpected happens. It hits us. Whether it’s our hospital security blanket that gets taken away or just the reality of “now what’s”

Do Chicken, Pizza and Cabbage Keep Colon Cancer Away?

The explosion of social media has brought about a phenomenon in many circles, including the colon cancer community. While online resources have “boomed” and allowed us to learn more about disease than ever before, we must not forget to be careful about what we read. Or share on Facebook. Or Retweet. Do Not Believe Everything You Read Online Most of us remember one of the new “golden rules” of the Internet Age:  You Cannot Trust Everything You Read Online. There’s a reason most teachers discourage students from using Wikipedia for homework. While many of us try to keep that in mind, the more that trusted newspapers, magazines,  journals and professional organizations

Cancer-versaries

One perk (if there are any perks) to surviving cancer is getting another special day added to a celebration calendar. In addition to birthdays and anniversaries, many cancer survivors celebrate a “cancer-versary.” It’s a day (or a series of days) that mark significant milestones of the cancer journey. Although many survivors celebrate at least one day of the year, there’s often confusion as to which “day” should be celebrated. A cancer experience can include several significant dates to choose from: “Diagnosis Day” My physician told me that I was a cancer survivor the date of my diagnosis. So I often celebrate January 23 – the day I heard the “C” word for the

Clinical Conundrum: When, how to treat colorectal cancer in the elderly

Even as scientists plumb deep into cells and molecules to understand cancer, there are many immediate and “real-life” questions that researchers and clinicians are discussing at the 2013 annual ASCO meeting (American Society of Clinical Oncology). One of the biggest puzzles for colorectal cancer is how to best treat the elderly, especially those with stages II or III (non-metastatic) cancer. It’s a huge question: today, 40 percent of colorectal cancer patients are elderly, and by the year 2030, more than 70 percent of non-inherited colorectal cancer will be among those 65 or older. Currently, 70 years old is the median age at diagnosis, with fully 40 percent of diagnoses made

CDC Urges MDs to Give More Antiviral Treatment for Flu Cases

The Centers for Disease Control is urging doctors to prescribe antiviral medications to high-risk patients suspected of having the flu, even without a positive test. When given within 48 hours of symptoms appearing, antivirals like Tamiflu or Relenza can ease symptoms, shorten illness, and prevent serious complications. Clinicians are not prescribing antiviral medications as often as in previous years, even though the 2013 flu season is causing more hospitalizations and deaths according to government figures. Complications from this year’s predominant flu strain are especially high among the elderly, causing half of hospitalizations and 90% of deaths so far. With a sharp increase in both hospitalizations and deaths in the 2nd week

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