Tag Archives: colorectal cancer

Monday Recap | 2013 Call-on Congress

A small group of advocates from Virgina sat in a circle. Tasked with telling their stories, each took turns explaining what led them to the 2013 Call-on Congress. A girlfriend of a survivor who passed away several years ago kicked off with her story. Then two colorectal cancer survivors chimed in. A Fight Colorectal Cancer staff member explained what led her to taking a job at the organization. And then, the circle got quiet. As a young woman sitting next to me tried to speak, her eyes welled up and tears streamed down her face. Although she never managed to tell her story, we all knew she came in memory

Important information to know – from screening to diagnosis for colorectal cancer

Tips From a Member of Our Medical Advisory Board Al B. Benson III, MD, FACP FASCO is Professor of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine,  and Associate Director for Clinical Investigations, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University One of the nation’s most respected experts in colorectal cancer, Dr. Benson has supported and worked with Fight Colorectal Cancer for years as an active member of our Medical Advisory Board.   Written by Dr. Al Benson, March 18 2013, Chicago, Illinois Although March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, this disease is so frequent yet in most cases preventable that we should be striving every month of the year to make even more people

Capitol Hill Countdown – One Week | 2013 Call-on Congress

Next Monday morning, you will find me nursing a hot cup of airport coffee as I head to Washington DC for the 2013 Call-on Congress – Fight Colorectal Cancer’s 7th Call-on Congress event. I will be recapping each day on the blog so that all advocates (near and far) can stay in the loop and take action during Call-on Congress 2013. I’m sure I will also find ways to add my survivor voice into the mix, along with the voices of the other 80+ attendees. Oh – and I might crack a poop joke or two. Consider yourself forewarned! First time for everything This will be my first time at

The Power to Prevent Colorectal Cancer is In Your Hands

You can make a difference in the fight against colorectal cancer wherever you are! Use our ONE MILLION STRONG TOOLBOX as a guide for how to get involved now in the fight against colorectal cancer. Do you have a smart phone? Do you tweet? Post Instagram pictures? Are you on Facebook? Join our social media campaign to let your friends, family, and coworkers know why it’s so important to get screened for colorectal cancer. 3 ways you can help: On Twitter: Follow us. Tweet about why you are strong, observations and photos using the hashtag #1MilStrong and tag @FightCRC On Facebook Like us. Post photos, updates, and videos to our wall.

One Million Strong Times Square Kickoff!

What better way to turn on March’s spotlight to colon cancer than an event in NYC’s Times Square! If you own a smart phone, tweet or use Facebook please join Fight Colorectal Cancer for our One Million Strong kickoff on March 1. Live in NYC? Even better. Click here if you live or work near NYC. Click here if you live elsewhere but still want to help! Read on to learn how YOU can show the world why YOU are part of One Million Strong.   Times Square. March 1. Be There. Live or work in NYC? Our team at Fight Colorectal Cancer needs YOU! Here is the roundup of

Cancer-Related Fatigue: Real, Treatable, and Under-Treated

Life-altering fatigue will affect 80% of people getting chemotherapy or radiation therapy, plus most people who have metastatic cancer, and even many survivors long after treatment is done. Yet fatigue in cancer patients has been under-reported, under-diagnosed, and under-treated, according to an expert panel convened by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) a decade ago to recommend cancer-related fatigue treatment guidelines. Some good news: A recent Dutch study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology found that advanced cancer patients can get significant relief from serious fatigue, when their fatigue and other symptoms are regularly monitored and treated according to guidelines. Some less good news: A small U.S. study published

Texas Native Wins A Free Screening and a Second Chance

“A cook-off saved my life.” That’s what Brett Gallaway wrote on his Facebook page on October 3, 2012, after reality sank in. He’d just heard from his doctor that a precancerous polyp had been found during his screening colonoscopy.  A polyp that, if left in place, could have developed into full-blown colorectal cancer. “I didn’t even know I had it,” Brett said.  “I didn’t have any symptoms.” Thanks to a raffle he won at a barbecue cook-off, he was able to receive a free colonoscopy and find the cancer early. Brett’s Facebook page filled with “Likes” and comments. A lot of them were testimonials from friends who had brushes with cancer or

High Carb Diets Newly Linked With Higher Colorectal Cancer Recurrence

By Curt Pesman Low-carb (and lower sugar) diets may soon look a lot better to colorectal cancer survivors. In a recent data-rich study of more than 1000 stage III colon cancer survivors, researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute found that those who consistently ate a high-carbohydrate, sugar-laden diet appeared to have markedly higher recurrence rates of their disease than patients whose diets were more varied and contained less-sugar. The results were published in the Nov. 7 Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The main finding after surveying and following 1,011 patients during and 6 months after chemotherapy? That those who reported having the highest dietary levels of carbohydrate intake (and related

Should All Colorectal Tumors Be Tested for Lynch Syndrome?

An international study described in the Oct. 17 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that universal tumor testing in all newly diagnosed colorectal patients produced a “modest increase” in finding people with Lynch syndrome. One in every 35 people with colorectal cancer has Lynch syndrome – an inherited genetic mutation which greatly increases the person’s chance of developing colorectal cancer more than once, plus other cancers (stomach, pancreas, urinary system, brain or skin cancers). Women with Lynch syndrome also face a 40-60 percent chance of developing endometrial (uterine) cancer in their lifetime and an increased risk for ovarian cancer. Until genetic tests of tumors became available in recent

Circulating Tumor Cells And CEA Levels Help Predict Survival in Metastatic CRC

Circulating tumor cells (rare cells from a cancerous tumor that appear in the bloodstream) can help predict how a person with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) might do over time. A study published in the October 2012 Annals of Oncology compared levels of CTCs with levels of CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) to see how the two tests compared or could be used together to predict survival times in metastatis CRC. Results in 217 patients with metastatic CRC showed that at the beginning of treatment, CTC numbers alone–not CEA levels–could accurately predict length of survival. But when patients had a high initial level of CEA levels, adding the CTC number helped predict which patients would

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