Tag Archives: clinical trials

ACA Mandates Insurance Coverage for Clinical Trials

By January 1, all insurers will be required to cover routine care for patients enrolled in clinical trials. (Typically any experimental care is provided at no cost to the patient.) “This should be seen as a step forward for the U.S. oncology community,” wrote Dr. Y-Ning Wong in the ASCO Daily News from the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s meeting in Chicago. “However, patients and providers must remain vigilant about the law’s implementation.” Currently there is a patchwork of state laws; as of January  2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) creates a federally required minimum that all private insurers must cover at least the usual care when patients enroll in a

Colon Cancer Prevention Trial Seeking New Patients

Can drugs used to help lower cholesterol also keep colon cancer from returning?  Researchers at the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) are seeking patients for a one-year clinical trial to determine if cholesterol-lowering drugs (statins) might help prevent the growth of precancerous (adenomatous) polyps and/or recurrent colorectal cancer. The NSABP trial is sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and has recently expanded to include patients with stage 0, I, II or III colon cancer at diagnosis. Patients can enter the study up to one year after their initial diagnosis. In 2011, Fight Colorectal Cancer’s late Director of Research Communications Kate Murphy wrote about the trial and its efforts

National polyp prevention trial needs participants

  Do cholesterol-lowering drugs help prevent CRC? You might be able to help answer that question. A national research project needs people who have been treated for early-stage (stage I or II) colorectal cancer in the past year. There have been tantalizing hints that cholesterol-lowering drugs (statins) might help prevent the growth of precancerous (adenomatous) polyps and/or recurrent colorectal cancer. Millions of Americans already take these statins to protect against heart attacks. We also know that people who have had early-stage colorectal cancer have up to a 50% chance of developing new polyps within 3 years. Some studies have shown that people who had taken statins had lower rates of

New Trial Looks to Reduce Recurrence and Neuropathy for Stage III Patients

If you are diagnosed with stage III colon cancer, you will probably receive about six months of treatment with FOLFOX after surgery. Research shows that this treatment regimen helps prevent recurrence for some – but not all – patients with stage III colon cancer.  A clinical trial has been launched to answer two questions about this current standard of care: 1. Will recurrence rates go down if both FOLFOX and celecoxib (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug similar to aspirin) are used for treatment? 2.  Will recurrence rates stay the same and long term side effects decrease if FOLFOX is used for three months?

X-PECT Trial is Fully Enrolled

The X-PECT phase III clinical trial has finished recruiting over 430 patients, evaluating perifosine treatment for patients with advanced colorectal cancer who have exhausted standard treatments. The trial compares the effectiveness of adding perifosine to Xeloda® (capecitabine). Led by Johanna Bendell, M.D., from the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville, TN, the trial is being conducted at 65 sites in the United States.

CRC Groups Join Together to Offer Clinical Trial Matching

Leading colorectal cancer advocacy organizations Colon Cancer Alliance and Fight Colorectal Cancer announced that they are teaming up on an initiative to encourage patients with colorectal cancer to take charge of their diagnosis and learn about clinical trials. The Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trial Call to Action campaign matches colorectal cancer patients with currently recruiting clinical trials based on their individual medical situation. The easy-to-use resources, powered by EmergingMed, help patients discuss with their doctor clinical trials that may be appropriate for them.  The personalized service is free, confidential, and available to patients, loved ones and healthcare professionals. “Patients who participate in clinical trials also help further colorectal cancer research,” said

Help Answer Questions About Exercise after Colon Cancer Treatment

Are you done — or almost done — with your treatment for colon cancer? Will you help answer a question about how to help colon cancer survivors  increase their physical activity? You’ll learn more about colon cancer and may be randomly assigned to a special interactive program that is designed to help recovering colon cancer patients develop a healthy lifestyle. The Survivorship Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS) study is available in centers in Wisconsin, Texas, North Carolina, and Connecticut.  To be part of the research, you need to have completed treatment for stage I, II, or III colon cancer within the past 12 months. 

Hedgehog Fails to Help Advanced Colorectal Cancer Patients

In disappointing news, adding the Hedgehog inhibitor GDC-0449 to standard chemotherapy failed to increase the time before advanced colorectal cancer got worse. Researchers compared progression-free survival between patients who got either FOLFOX or FOLFIRI chemotherapy with Avastin and a group who got the same chemo regimen with GDC-0449. There was no difference

No Benefit Adding Cetuximab to Chemo for Stage III Colon Cancer

Adding Erbitux® (cetuximab) to standard chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer didn’t improve patient outcomes and added more side effects. All of the patients in the NO147 trial had cancer that had spread to their lymph nodes and had surgery before beginning chemotherapy. They had normal or wild-type KRAS genes in their tumors.They were randomly assigned to FOLFOX chemotherapy for 6 months or FOLFOX plus Erbitux.  The trial was closed before the planned number of patients were enrolled because an analysis showed that there was no benefit to the additional Erbitux and continuing the trial would not help patients.

Clinical Trial at NIH for Unresectable Liver Tumors

Patients with liver tumors, including those that have spread from colorectal cancer, can enroll in a clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda. The trial will test the effectiveness of infusing the drug melphalan through the artery that feeds the liver. Colorectal cancer patients with liver metastases are eligible for the trial if they have already had chemotherapy including irinotecan or oxaliplatin.  Limited cancer outside of the liver is acceptable if the most serious problem is within the liver itself.

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